Your major is just the beginning...

Your major helps you develop knowledge, skills and abilities that employers seek.

To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through your coursework, activities and work, consider using the reflection worksheets (accessible via B.hired > Resources) and/or Type Focus (accessible via B.hired > Resources).

To build your resume, please review Hiatt's sample resumes.

Internships

bix

The Brandeis Internship Exchange is a convenient online tool to find and share internship opportunities.

Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to search internships by major.

Social Justice and Social Policy

Overview
First Destination Data
Alumni Career Paths
Internships
What to do with a degree in Social Justice and Social Policy
Social Justice and Social Policy Web Sites
Graduate School Information

Overview 

The program in Social Justice and Social Policy examines the essential connections between social values and practical policies. It unites elements in liberal arts study to bridge the analytic gap between ends and means. The concern with social justice speaks to the core educational commitments of Brandeis. This program does not seek to promote a particular ideological agenda, but rather to spark creative thinking about complex social problems. It carries the search for norms and principles into the wider arena of practical experience. By providing models for critical reflection, it challenges students to articulate their own value commitments in a spirit of constructive debate.

First Destination Data

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who majored in your discipline. Click here to download a sortable spreadsheet listing the first destination graduate programs and employment opportunities that Social Justice and Social Policy alumni from the classes of 2008-2012 secured within six months of graduation.

The diverse list is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a Social Justice and Social Policy major at Brandeis.

Social Justice and Social Policy Alumni

The Hiatt Center is pleased to provide a list of organizations, titles and fields of alumni who minored in your discipline. The list represents a wide array of professions, which is indicative of the wealth of transferable skills students cultivate as a History of Ideas minor at Brandeis.

Year Company Title Industry
2007 Rosie’s Place Public Policy Coordinator
2006 Outten & Golden LLP Paralegal Law
2006 Massasoit Community College Dean, Humanities & Fine Arts Education
1991 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute @ Brandeis (BOLLI) Director Education

Internships 

In addition to you coursework, internships can be extremely beneficial as you develop academic and professional skills.  The Brandeis Internship Exchange is an easy and convenient online tool for you to find and share real internship opportunities.  Just log on with your UNET ID and use the advanced search to identify majors' internships.

What to Do with a Degree in Social Justice and Social Policy (.pdf)

Social Justice Websites

Graduate School Information and Resources

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Skills, Abilities & Knowledge

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Your program of study at Brandeis University provides both field-specific knowledge and a broad range of transferable skills, abilities and knowledge that are sought after by all employers in all fields and enhance your experience and success in the world of work. To identify additional skills and abilities you have developed through coursework, activities and work, take TypeFocus.

Skills1

  • Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.
  • Social Perceptiveness — Being aware of others' reactions and understanding why they react as they do.
  • Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.
  • Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others' actions.
  • Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.
  • Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Abilities

  • Oral and Written Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken and written word.
  • Oral and Written Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking and writing so others will understand.
  • Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.
  • Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).
  • Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.
  • Fluency of Ideas — The ability to come up with a number of ideas about a topic.

Knowledge

  • Psychology — Knowledge of human behavior and performance; individual differences in ability, personality, and interests; learning and motivation; psychological research methods; and the assessment and treatment of behavioral and affective disorders.
  • Sociology and Anthropology — Knowledge of group behavior and dynamics, societal trends and influences, human migrations, ethnicity, cultures and their history and origins.
  • Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.
  • Law and Government — Knowledge of laws, legal codes, court procedures, precedents, government regulations, executive orders, agency rules, and the democratic political process.
  • Communications and Media — Knowledge of media production, communication, and dissemination techniques and methods. This includes alternative ways to inform and entertain via written, oral, and visual media.

1 Excerpted from O*Net OnLine, US Department of Labor by the National Center for O*Net Development


Sample of Possible Occupations

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Non-Profit Agency Director
Policy & Planning Specialist
Social Worker, Case Worker
Aging/Gerontology
Developmental Disabilities
Program Manager or Administrator
Attorney, Judge, Paralegal
Eligibility Specialist
Policy Advocate or Policy Analyst
Case Worker
Community Organization Director
Research Analyst
Health Care Specialist
Policy Analyst (Healthcare, Education, etc.)
Consultant
Non-profit Administrator
Teacher