Before you enroll in French language courses (FREN 10–106):

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

Fall 2016 French and Francophone Studies Courses


Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.

ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN FRENCH LANGUAGE COURSES (FREN 10–106). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


FREN 10A Beginning French
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Nenciu
Prerequisite: Consent code required. Students with no previous knowledge of French and those with a minimal background, please see instructions in bar to right.
What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? This course will introduce learners to French language and culture and will help them speak, listen, read, and write about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

FREN 20B Continuing French
(1) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Donlan
(2) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Voiret
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
How do the French perceive space? How does the experience of an American student differ from that of a French student in high school and university? How do the French plaisirs de la table differ from American attitudes toward food? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

FREN 32A Intermediate French: Conversation
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Theobald
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Theobald
(3) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50; F 12:30–1:20, Staff
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Did you study French in the past and feel now that what you need most is to be able to speak? The French Conversation class is for you! It will focus on oral communication skills: pronunciation, oral comprehension, acquisition of common vocabulary, and conversational practice. Our materials will include radio and television programs, film, and newspapers.

FREN 105A France Today: French Conversation
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Nenciu
Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course, FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

FREN 106B The Art of Composition
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Nenciu
Prerequisite: FREN 104b, FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Study of French composition through analysis of passages from novels, poems, short stories and newspaper articles. Emphasis will be placed on techniques of writing in French, such as dissertation and explication de texte.

FREN 110A Cultural Representations
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Harder
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
How do socio-economic class structures, political situations, and social frameworks help to shape literary works? How do literary genres influence the texts and images they give birth to? Reading works of theatre, prose (novel), and poetry, we will explore the cultural portraits that only literature can reveal.

poster for FREN 129a fall 2016

FREN 129A La Révolution tranquille?: Québec Culture Wars on Stage and Screen
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Theobald
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Considers plays and films from the last sixty years that have probed the tensions at the heart of Québécois culture to provide a violent counterpart to the sexual, political, and generational "Révolution tranquille" of the 1960s and 1970s. As part of the curriculum, this class will include a weekend trip to Montréal.

poster for FREN 134b fall 2016

FREN 134B Masculine/Feminine
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Voiret
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Examines diverse representations of masculinity and femininity in French literature today and in the past with special focus on historical and cultural aspects. Readings include: Beigbeder, 99 francs; Duras, L’amant; Stendahl, Le Rouge et le Noir; excerpts from: Rousseau, Emile; readings from Beauvoir and Badinter; and films like the L’esquive (a contemporary banlieue version of an 18th century play).


CROSS-LISTED WITH FRENCH & FRANCOPHONE STUDIES

ECS 100A European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Dowden
Explores the interrelationship of literature, music, painting, philosophy, and other arts in the era of high modernism. Works by Artaud, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Mann, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Kandinsky, Schiele, Beckett, Brecht, Adorno, Sartre, Heidegger, and others.

ENG 115B Fictions of Liberty: Europe in a Revolutionary Age
(1) T,F 12:30–1:50, Reed
The "Age of Enlightenment" fostered new notions of human rights that found their tumultuous proving ground in the French Revolution. Through writings from several genres and nations, this course explores some of the political, economic, religious, racial, and sexual "fictions of liberty" that have shaped our own time.

FA 158B 20th Century Painting in France: Picasso and Matisse
(1) T,F 9:30–10:50, Scott
Examines the roots of major 20th century tendencies in art: the development of Cubism by Pablo Picasso and his circle; the color revolution of Fauvism, initiated by Henri Matisse. Topics include examination of the artists, poets, and collectors associated with both Picasso and Matisse, the modernist innovation of the arts in Paris, and the period of Surrealism up to World War II.

HUM/UWS 1A Tragedy: Love and Death in the Creative Imagination
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Burt/Dowden
How do you turn catastrophe into art—and why? This first-year seminar in the humanities addresses such elemental questions, especially those centering on love and death. How does literature catch hold of catastrophic experiences and make them intelligible or even beautiful? Should misery even be beautiful? By exploring the tragic tradition in literature across many eras, cultures, genres, and languages, this course looks for basic patterns.


Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.