Before you enroll in French language courses (FREN 10–106):

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

Spring 2016 French and Francophone Studies Courses


Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.

ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN FRENCH LANGUAGE COURSES (FREN 10–106). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


FREN 10A Beginning French
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Nenciu
Prerequisite: Consent code required. Students with no previous knowledge of French and those with a minimal background, please see instructions in bar to right.
What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? This course will introduce learners to French language and culture and will help them speak, listen, read, and write about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

FREN 20B Continuing French
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Voiret
(2) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Voiret
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
How do the French perceive space? How does the experience of an American student differ from that of a French student in high school and university? How do the French plaisirs de la table differ from American attitudes toward food? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

FREN 32A Intermediate French: Conversation
(2) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Nenciu
(3) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50; F 12:30–1:20, Nenciu
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Did you study French in the past and feel now that what you need most is to be able to speak? The French Conversation class is for you! It will focus on oral communication skills: pronunciation, oral comprehension, acquisition of common vocabulary, and conversational practice. Our materials will include radio and television programs, film, and newspapers.

FREN 104B Advanced Language Skills through Culture
(1) M,W,Th 10:00–10:50, Fauré-Bellaïche
Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Students advance their study of the French language and culture by continuing to hone speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. We will focus on contemporary youth and pop cultures through the exploration of a wide variety of materials including films, articles, songs, and graphic novels as well as touch upon the position of France and French-speaking countries in the world.

FREN 105A France Today: French Conversation
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Chimu Harley
Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course, FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

FREN 106B The Art of Composition
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Harder
Prerequisite: FREN 104b, FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Study of French composition through analysis of passages from novels, poems, short stories and newspaper articles. Emphasis will be placed on techniques of writing in French, such as dissertation and explication de texte.

FREN 111A The Republic
(1) M,W 3:30–4:50, Randall
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
The "Republic" analyzes how the republican ideal of the citizen devoid of religious, ethnic, or gender identity has fared in different Francophone political milieux. Course involves understanding how political institutions such as constitutions, parliaments, and court systems interact with reality of modern societies in which religious, ethnic, and gender identities play important roles.

image of FREN 154b poster for spring 2016
FREN 154B Regard vers la Chine
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Voiret
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
This course examines how China has often been represented by French writers and artists as the Other in order to question their own society, artistic practices, and political order. We will also wonder if the new generation of francophone writers born in China offers a different vision of their country of origin. The course includes novels, poetry, movies, and paintings.

FREN 162B From Les Confessions to Tumblr—Self-Writing in Contemporary French and Francophone Literature
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Fauré-Bellaïche
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Through the works of major writers, the main goal of the course will be to study the many variations upon autobiographical writing that characterize contemporary French and Francophone literature, and to relate them to the renewed exploration of the post-modern subject. We will examine along the way how the self relates to the others, how it engages with filiation, memory and history – especially World War II and the Franco-Algerian War - and we will put an emphasis on the notions of self-fashioning and performance.



CROSS-LISTED WITH FRENCH & FRANCOPHONE STUDIES

PHIL 177B Simone Weil
(1) M,W 5:00–6:20, Yourgrau
Studies the French philosopher Simone Weil, revolutionary and mystic. Is divine perfection reconcilable with human suffering? Weil shook the foundations of Christianity and Judaism attempting to answer this question and this course will rejoin her quest.



Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.