Before you enroll in French language courses (FREN 10–106):

PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS BELOW.

1. Students currently enrolled in FREN language courses (FREN 10-105) will receive instructions about consent code distribution before the beginning of registration.

2. All others should email Professor Harder (harder@brandeis.edu) as soon as possible with a description of their background in French, including classes taken, standardized test scores, and/or other exposure to the language. She will reply with further instructions about obtaining a consent code for the appropriate language course.

Fall 2017 French and Francophone Studies Courses


Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.

ALL STUDENTS NEED A CONSENT CODE TO ENROLL IN FRENCH LANGUAGE COURSES (FREN 10–106). PLEASE READ INSTRUCTIONS IN BAR TO RIGHT.


FREN 10A Beginning French
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Nenciu
Prerequisite: Consent code required. Students with no previous knowledge of French and those with a minimal background, please see instructions in bar to right.
What do Montréal, Paris, and Dakar have in common? What are the rules regarding how many times one kisses a friend on the cheeks? Why is France called l’Hexagone? This course will introduce learners to French language and culture and will help them speak, listen, read, and write about everyday situations in France and Francophone countries.

FREN 20B Continuing French
(1) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Voiret
(2) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Voiret
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 10a or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
How do the French perceive space? How does the experience of an American student differ from that of a French student in high school and university? How do the French plaisirs de la table differ from American attitudes toward food? Learners will deepen their knowledge of French and Francophone cultures while expanding their ability to speak, read, listen, and write in French.

FREN 32A Intermediate French: Conversation
(1) M,W,Th,F 9:00–9:50, Theobald
(2) M,W,Th,F 11:00–11:50, Nenciu
(3) M,W,Th,F 10:00–10:50, Theobald
Prerequisite: A grade of C- or higher in FREN 20b or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Did you study French in the past and feel now that what you need most is to be able to speak? The French Conversation class is for you! It will focus on oral communication skills: pronunciation, oral comprehension, acquisition of common vocabulary, and conversational practice. Our materials will include radio and television programs, film, and newspapers.


FREN 104B Advanced Language Skills through Culture
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Theobald
Prerequisite: A 30-level FREN course or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Students advance their study of the French language and culture by continuing to hone speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. We will focus on contemporary youth and pop cultures through the exploration of a wide variety of materials including films, articles, songs, and graphic novels as well as touch upon the position of France and French-speaking countries in the world.

FREN 105A France Today: French Conversation
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Nenciu
Prerequisite: FREN 104b, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Improve your speaking skills while learning about and discussing socio–cultural issues that distinguish the French view of the world from that of Americans. Students will focus on expressing themselves better orally while continuing their work on reading, listening, and writing.

FREN 106B The Art of Composition
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Voiret
Prerequisite: FREN 105a, or the equivalent. Consent code required (please see instructions in bar to right).
Study of French composition through analysis of passages from novels, poems, short stories and newspaper articles. Emphasis will be placed on techniques of writing in French, such as dissertation and explication de texte.

image of poster for FREN 110 fall 2017
FREN 110A Cultural Representations

(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Fauré-Bellaïche
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
How do socio-economic class structures, political situations, and social frameworks help to shape literary works? How do literary genres influence the texts and images they give birth to? Reading works of theatre, prose (novel), and poetry, we will explore the cultural portraits that only literature can reveal.

image of poster for FREN 139 fall 2017
FREN 139A Bad Girls / Les Filles de mauvais genre

(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Harder
Prerequisite: FREN 106, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Through a selection of literary texts, articles, images, and films, students will explore how works from the Middle Ages to present day depict female figures in the French and Francophone world who have failed to conform to expectations of their gender.

image of poster for FREN 150 fall 2017
FREN 150B French Detective Novels: Major Questions for a Minor Genre?

(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Randall
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Examines how French and Francophone detective novels take on big questions such as the origin of evil and how do you know what you know. Authors include Fred Vargas, Simenon, Driss Chraibi, Moussa Konate.

image of poster for FREN 151 fall 2017
FREN 151B Francophone Identities in a Global World: An Introduction to Francophone Literature
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Fauré-Bellaïche
Prerequisite: FREN 106b or the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.
Introduces Francophone literature and film, retracing, through the works of great contemporary Francophone writers and directors, the evolution of the Francophone world, from the colonial struggles to the transcultural and transnational trajectories of our global era.


CROSS-LISTED WITH FRENCH & FRANCOPHONE STUDIES

ECS 100A European Cultural Studies Proseminar: Modernism
(1) M,W 2:00–3:20, Dowden
Explores the interrelationship of literature, music, painting, philosophy, and other arts in the era of high modernism. Works by Artaud, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Mann, Mahler, Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Kandinsky, Schiele, Beckett, Brecht, Adorno, Sartre, Heidegger, and others.

HIST 133A Politics of the Enlightenment
(1) M,W,Th 12:00–12:50, Hulliung
Examines the Enlightenment as a source of the intellectual world we live in today. Examination of some of the political, philosophical, and scientific writings of the philosophers.

HIST 192B Romantic and Existentialist Political Thought
(1) M,W,Th 1:00–1:50, Hulliung
Readings from Camus, Sartre, Beckett, and others. Examination and criticism of romantic and existentialist theories of politics.

HUM/UWS 1A Tragedy: Love and Death in the Creative Imagination
(1) M,W,Th 11:00–11:50, Burt/Dowden
How do you turn catastrophe into art - and why? This first-year seminar in the humanities addresses such elemental questions, especially those centering on love and death. How does literature catch hold of catastrophic experiences and make them intelligible or even beautiful? Should misery even be beautiful? By exploring the tragic tradition in literature across many eras, cultures, genres, and languages, this course looks for basic patterns.


TAUGHT BY FRENCH AND FRANCOPHONE FACULTY

image of poster for COML 123 fall 2017
COML 123A Perfect Love?

(1) M,W 3:30–4:50, Randall
See how some of the greatest writers (Boccaccio, Hawthorne, Marguerite de Navarre)  film makers (Wong Kar-wai and Di Sica), and composers (Monteverdi) have treated a problem that almost everyone knows too well:  how the all too-common desire to achieve "perfect love" all too-often ends up on the rocks.


Schedule information is tentative. Please see the Registrar's Schedule of Classes for current listings.