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Summer Institute 2017


Wednesday, May 31

  • 10 - 11 am, Yiting Li (Brandeis University) 
    Title: "Introduction to some basic background of random matrix"    
    Abstract: In this talk I will introduce some basic concepts and results in the random matrix theory. They will include: GOE, GUE, Wigner's semicircle law, Tracy-Widom distribution. If time allows I will also introduce the universality of Wigner matrix and the circular law.
  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Robert Marsland (MIT)
    Title: "The Edge of Thermodynamics: Driven Steady States in Physics and Biology" PDF of Marsland's talk here
    Abstract: From its inception, statistical mechanics has aspired to become the link between biology and physics. But classical statistical mechanics dealt primarily with systems in thermal equilibrium, where detailed balance forbids the autonomous directed motion characteristic of living things. Significant theoretical effort has been expended in the last twenty years to extend thermodynamic formalism to encompass nonequilibrium structures, which are sustained by a constant flux of matter or energy. This generalization is most promising in ergodic systems, which reach a steady state in finite time that is independent of the initial condition. In my talk, I will address two basic questions about these driven steady states: Under what conditions does nonequilibrium thermodynamics tell us something new about their measurable properties? And what design goals can be achieved in these states that are impossible at equilibrium? 

Thursday, June 1

  • 10 - 11 am, Carl Merrigan (Brandeis University)
    Title: "Introduction to First Passage Times"
    Abstract: A common statistical question that can come up is to ask what will be the the distribution of times taken for some event of interest to occur for the very first time. For instance, at what time will a neuron first fire or at what time will a stock value reach a certain threshold. First passage time questions can be dealt with exactly for many scenarios involving simple random walks and/or continuum diffusion processes. In this talk, I will give an introduction to the techniques involved by outlining the steps in calculating the first passage time distribution for a 1d lattice random walk. I will also indicate how the continuum version of the same result can be derived. 
  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Yiting Li (Brandeis University)
    Title: "Rigidity of eigenvalues for beta ensemble in multi-cut regime" PDF
    Abstract: I will first talk about the background and some well known results of beta ensemble. Then I will introduce the rigidity of eigenvalues for beta ensemble in multi-cut regime, i.e., the fact that each eigenvalue in the bulk is very close to its "classical location". The probability that the distance between the eigenvalue and its classical location is larger than N^{-1+r} is exponentially small where r is an arbitrarily small positive number. The model is an generalization of the beta ensemble in one-cut regime for which the rigidity of eigenvalues was proved by Bourgade, Erdos and Yau. This is the work of my thesis.

Friday, June 2

  • 10 - 11 am, Xiaoming Mao (University of Michigan)
    Title: "Maxwell lattices and topological mechanics"
    Abstract: In this short course I will introduce the new field of topological mechanics.  I will start from basics of Maxwell lattices which are mechanical structures at the verge of instability, and discuss the recent literature of using these lattices to the study of soft matter systems.  Then I will discuss how the topology of the phonon band structure of these Maxwell lattices lead to the interesting phenomena of topological floppy edge modes in these lattices, which give rise to reconfigurable asymmetric edge stiffness, with potential applications in materials science.

  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Joe Rauch (Brandeis University)
    Title: "Public goods production counters niche competition and enables multi-species coexistence"
    Abstract: Traditional theoretical ecology has difficulty explaining the large amount of diversity observed in natural microbial communities. Due to observations of frequency dependent growth of microbes in the presence of an essential public good, we investigated the public good game’s influence on the diversity of microbial communities. We find the public good game reproduces both low and highly diverse communities. Additionally, the model predicts other observed features of microbial communities, including key stone species, a functional cache, and equilibrium dependence on initial colonization.

  • 1:30 - 2:30 pm, Xiaoming Mao (University of Michigan)
    Title: "Maxwell lattices and topological mechanics"
    Abstract:  In this short course I will introduce the new field of topological mechanics.  I will start from basics of Maxwell lattices which are mechanical structures at the verge of instability, and discuss the recent literature of using these lattices to the study of soft matter systems.  Then I will discuss how the topology of the phonon band structure of these Maxwell lattices lead to the interesting phenomena of topological floppy edge modes in these lattices, which give rise to reconfigurable asymmetric edge stiffness, with potential applications in materials science.

Monday, June 5

  • 10 - 11 am, Todd Gingrich (MIT)
    Title: "Dynamical fluctuations in Markov processes - A Primer on Stochastic Thermodynamics, Fluctuation Theorems, and Large Deviations"
    Abstract: The dynamics of many physical systems may be modeled using Markov processes, and the statistical irreversibility of those Markov processes can be related to the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system (heat flow, particle flux, etc. supplied by external reservoirs). I will first review this Stochastic Thermodynamic framework then will introduce tools from Large Deviation Theory to analyze the dynamical fluctuations of Markov processes. Using these large deviation methods we will derive the entropy production fluctuation theorem as well as the more recently discovered "thermodynamic uncertainty principle" for fluctuating nonequilibrium currents.

  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Lishibanya Mohapatra (Brandeis University)
    Title: "How cells control the size of their organelles?"
    Abstract: Cells contain a number of micron-scale structures, whose physiological functions are related to their size. Examples include cytoskeletal elements like mitotic spindle, cilia and actin cables. Each of these structures is characterized by a narrow size distribution and is composed of molecular building blocks (tubulin dimers and actin monomers) that diffuse in the cytoplasm. A key question in cell biology is how the size of these structures is maintained in light of constant turnover of their molecular components. Using theory, simulations and experiments in various cell types, I will describe how we can aim to uncover design principles of size-control in biology.  

Tuesday, June 6

  • 10 - 11 am, Brad Marston (Brown University)
    Title: "El Niño as a Topological Insulator: A Surprising Connection Between Climate, and Quantum, Physics”
    Abstract: Symmetries and topology play central roles in our understanding of physics. Topology explains the precise quantization of the Hall effect and the protection of surface states in topological insulators against scattering from disorder or bumps. However discrete symmetries and topology have so far played little role in thinking about the fluid dynamics of oceans and atmospheres. I show that, as a consequence of the rotation of the Earth that breaks time reversal symmetry, equatorially trapped Kelvin and Yanai waves emerge as topologically protected edge modes. Thus the oceans and atmosphere of Earth naturally shares basic physics with topological insulators. As equatorially trapped Kelvin waves in the Pacific ocean are an important component of El Niño Southern Oscillation, these new results demonstrate that topology plays a surprising role in Earth’s climate system.

  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Todd Gingrich (MIT)
    Title: "Dynamical fluctuations in Markov processes - A Primer on Stochastic Thermodynamics, Fluctuation Theorems, and Large Deviations"
    Abstract: The dynamics of many physical systems may be modeled using Markov processes, and the statistical irreversibility of those Markov processes can be related to the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system (heat flow, particle flux, etc. supplied by external reservoirs). I will first review this Stochastic Thermodynamic framework then will introduce tools from Large Deviation Theory to analyze the dynamical fluctuations of Markov processes. Using these large deviation methods we will derive the entropy production fluctuation theorem as well as the more recently discovered "thermodynamic uncertainty principle" for fluctuating nonequilibrium currents.

Wednesday, June 7

  • 10 - 11 am, Todd Gingrich (MIT)
    Title: "Dynamical fluctuations in Markov processes - A Primer on Stochastic Thermodynamics, Fluctuation Theorems, and Large Deviations"
    Abstract: The dynamics of many physical systems may be modeled using Markov processes, and the statistical irreversibility of those Markov processes can be related to the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of the system (heat flow, particle flux, etc. supplied by external reservoirs). I will first review this Stochastic Thermodynamic framework then will introduce tools from Large Deviation Theory to analyze the dynamical fluctuations of Markov processes. Using these large deviation methods we will derive the entropy production fluctuation theorem as well as the more recently discovered "thermodynamic uncertainty principle" for fluctuating nonequilibrium currents.

  • 11:30 am - 12:30 pm, Rose Morris-Wright (Brandeis University)
    Title: "Generalizing Hyperbolic Space and its Groups of Isometries"
    Abstract: Historically, hyperbolic geometry has been a rich area of research for mathematicians and physicists. To generalize this theory, consider metric spaces which have many of the same properties as classical hyperbolic space, but which are not necessarily Remannian manifolds. I will introduce these hyperbolic-like spaces, as they were proposed by Gromov in 1983. I will then discuss some of the consequences of this theory for abstract algebra and group theory. Finally, I will discuss some further generalizations which are currently being studied, especially the concept of acylindrical hyperbolicity as defined by Osin in 2016.
Spring 2017


Thursday, April 20

Archana Kamal (U Mass Lowell)
Quantum information processing with chiral parametric interactions
Host: Albion Lawrence
Abstract: Harnessing parametric interactions is emerging as a new paradigm in quantum information processing platforms, with applications ranging from high-efficiency readout to implementation of fast qubit gates. In this talk, I will focus on how rendering these interactions chiral leads to new functionality and qualitatively new physics. I will first describe the use of parametrically-induced chirality for in-situ routing and directional amplification of quantum signals. I will then discuss the connection of such chirality with dissipation engineering, and how it may be used to realize novel dynamics in open quantum systems.

Thursday, March 30
Walter Fontana (Harvard Medical School)
Replacing a world we don’t understand with a model we don’t understand
Host: Albion Lawence
Abstract: Simplifying somewaht, we might say that, in physics, understanding precedes modeling. In molecular systems biology, as we get to know more about the inner workings of cells at the molecular scale, it appears as if modeling may have to precede understanding (at least initially). A model then must become a formal and executable representation of the facts it is based upon. I will sketch a rule-based approach of this vision that is aimed at reasoning about systems of protein-protein interaction. My intent is to spend most of the time on the opportunity, but also the challenge, of reasoning about causality in such models.

Monday, March 6
Srikanth Sastry (Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research)
Structure Formation and Force Networks in Shear Jammed Sphere Packings
Host: Bulbul Chakraborty

Thursday, March 2
Pavel Chvykov (MIT)
Principle of least rattling: a tale of non-equilibrium systems with disparate timescales
Host: Albion Lawrence
Abstract: For a large class of complicated interacting many-body systems, equilibrium thermodynamics manages to provide surprisingly simple principles governing the behaviors of some macroscopic, or coarse-grained, variables -- such as pressure or total energy. Nonetheless, many systems found in nature -- such as in biochemistry, ecology, traffic modelling, etc -- fall outside the constraints of equilibrium as they operate on constant energy fluxes. The vast generality of these non-equilibrium systems forces us to make simplifying assumptions to make progress: in this talk I restrict to dynamics with strong time-scale separation between a class of slowly varying degrees of freedom of interest, and the fast microscopic variables. I argue that in this case, quite generally, the slow variables tend to seek out the locations where fast dynamics are, in some sense, least chaotic or random. While illustrating this effect in specific toy-model simulations of a kicked-rotor on a cart, I also argue for more general applicability of the presented principle to active matter systems or even evolutionary adaptation. 

Wednesday, February 8
Baylor Fox-Kemper (Brown University)
From climate to Kolmogorov - upper ocean variability across scales
Host: Albion Lawrence

Fall 2016

Thursday, December 1, 2016

Steven Gubser (Princeton)
Joint IGERT/High Energy Theory Seminar
p-adic AdS/CFT
sponsored by DOE
Host: Albion Lawrence

Abstract:  I will explain how replacing the real numbers by the p-adic numbers and the bulk geometry of anti-de Sitter space by a discrete graph, we can arrive at a new version of the AdS/CFT correspondence with some links to the p-adic string.  Two-point, three-point, and four-point correlators can be computed starting from a classical action in the bulk.  In some cases, adelic product identities show interesting relationships with standard results in ordinary AdS/CFT.  I will describe candidate geometries for Wilson loops and comment on some ongoing work to find further probes of the correspondence.

Thursday, November 17, 2016
Daniel Ruberman (Brandeis)
Topological configurations of complex lines
Host: Albion Lawrence

Abstract: Configurations of lines in the plane have been studied since antiquity. In recent years, combinatorial methods have been used to decide if a specified incidence relation between certain objects ("lines") and other objects ("points") can be realized by actual points and lines in a projective plane over a field. For the real and complex fields, one can weaken the condition to look for topologically embedded lines (circles in the real case, spheres in the complex case) that meet according to a specified incidence relation. I will explain some joint work with Laura Starkston (Stanford) giving new topological restrictions on the realization of configurations of spheres in the complex projective plane.

Tuesday, November 8, 2016
Special IGERT/Physics Department Colloquium
Jeffrey Morris, CUNY
Friction and adhesion in colloids: Yielding, thickening, jamming
Host: Bulbul Chakraborty

Abstract: In recent work, we have shown [1,2] that frictional interactions provide a rational basis for both continuous and discontinuous shear thickening in viscous suspensions.   When the repulsive forces (such as those due to electrostatic or steric colloidal stabilization) are overwhelmed by shearing forces, contact is assumed to occur, and the system transitions from a low-viscosity (lubricated) to a high-viscosity (frictional) state. Contacting particles may experience both adhesive forces as well as friction.  We will consider the influence of attractive forces at contact, in combination with the stabilizing repulsive forces.  This combination of forces would be seen in the case of particles with van der Waals attraction in combination with colloidal stabilization.  For sufficient attractive force a yield stress and shear thinning give way to the shear thickening response, a behavior observed in certain flocculated dispersions.  At sufficient yield stress, the shear thickening is completely obscured, as the dispersions shear thins after yielding directly onto the high-viscosity (frictional) plateau.  The suggestion that a material may exhibit both yielding at low stress and jamming at large stress [3] is explored. 

1. R. Seto, R. Mari, J. F. Morris & M. M. Denn 2013 Discontinuous shear thickening of frictional hard-sphere suspensions. Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 218301.
2. . R. Mari, R. Seto J. F. Morris & M. M. Denn 2015 Discontinuous shear thickening in Brownian suspensions by dynamic simulation. Proc. National Acad. Sci.
  112. 15326.
3. N. J. Wagner & J. F. Brady 2009 Shear thickening in colloidal dispersions. Phys. Today62, 27-32.

Thursday, October 20, 2016
Shreyas Gokhale (MIT)
Dissecting the glass transition through critical experiments on colloids
Host: Bulbul Chakraborty

Abstract: The human race has engineered and manipulated glasses since times immemorial and yet, the basic physics underlying glass formation continues to elude our grasp. Even the most basic question of whether glass formation is a fundamentally thermodynamic or dynamic phenomenon remains unanswered. This state of affairs is due largely to the fact that available experimental data on molecular liquids, over as many as fourteen orders of magnitude, are unable to distinguish between macroscopic predictions of competing theoretical frameworks. In this talk, I will demonstrate how information on particle dynamics from experiments on dense colloidal suspensions can be harnessed to critically compare and contrast microscopic predictions of the random first-order transition theory (RFOT) and dynamical facilitation (DF), two of the most prominent competing theories of glass formation. In particular, I will show that a detailed analysis of shapes of cooperatively rearranging clusters of particles reveals a dynamical crossover from a facilitation dominated regime to one dominated by collective hopping events postulated within RFOT. Further, I will discuss how quenched disorder in the form of an amorphous wall can potentially serve as a diagnostic tool to assess the relative importance of structural relaxation mechanisms envisioned in RFOT and DF. In a broader context, these results indicate that even over the limited dynamical range available to colloid experiments and numerical simulations, dynamical crossovers can yield valuable insights into the physical processes responsible for glass formation.

Thursday, October 13, 2016
An Huang (Brandeis)
Graph embedding, quadratic forms, and toric geometry
Host: Albion Lawrence

Wednesday, October 5, 2016
Arijeet Pal (Oxford)
Finite temperature mobility
edge in many-body localized systems
Host: Kabir Ramola

Thursday, September 15, 2016
Matthew Roberts (U. of Chicago)
Emergent geometry in quantum Hall states & the composite Fermi liquid
Host: Albion Lawrence



Summer Institute 2016

Thursday, July 7, 2016 - Tuesday July 12, 2016

Speakers:

  • Daniel Goldstein (Brandeis University) ”A Kinetic Model of Active Extensile Bundles"
  • Julian Butcher (Brandeis University) "A Continuum Theory of Active Nematics in a Bounded, Two Dimensional System"
  • Sumantra Sarkar (MIT) “Force Tiling: Finding patterns in the forces"
  • Geoffrey Conklin (Brandeis University) "Chemical Modelling with Semi-Classical Valence Electrons"
  • Paul Miller (Brandeis University) "From the Ising model to cognition: exploring attractor states in neuroscience"
  • Benjamin Hancock (Brandeis University) "Statistical Mechanics and Hydrodynamics of Self-Propelled Hard Spheres"
  • Biji Wong (Brandeis University) "Turaev torsion & Seiberg-Witten invariants of 3-orbifolds"
Spring 2016


Wednesday, May 11, 2016
Edward Fredkin (Carnegie Mellon University)
On Cellular Automata and Physics

Wednesday, April 13, 2016
Jörn Callies (MIT)
Macroturbulence in the ocean

Wednesday, March 23, 2016
Melanie Mitchell, Portland State
Using Analogy to Recognize Visual Situations

Tuesday, March 8, 2016  
Aditi Mitra (NYU)
Quantum Quenches 

Wednesday, March 2, 2016
Carl Merrigan, Brandeis University
Role of the Initial Force Configuration  for Unjamming Grains in a Hopper

Wednesday, February 10, 2016
Ruoran Zhang, Northeastern University (Note: Quantitative Biology Lunch also held at this time).
Contact Chern-Simons Theory and Legendrian Knots

Wednesday, January 27, 2016
Naziru Awal (Brandeis)
Piecewise Linear Model of the BZ reaction

Fall 2015


Wednesday, December 9, 2015
Arunima Ray (Brandeis)
Concordance classes of knots and satellite operations

Wednesday, October 28, 2015
Itamar Procaccia, Weizmann Institute
What determines force chains in granular media?

Wednesday, October 14, 2015
R. Loganayagam (IAS Princeton)
Joint IGERT/Condensed Matter Seminar
Second law and the eightfold structure of relativistic fluid dynamics

Summer Institute 2015


Speakers
:

  • Sumit Das (University of Kentucky) "Quantum Quench and Holography" Lecture Notes
  • Chandan Dasgupta (IISC, Bangalore) "Introduction to spin glasses and structural glasses"   Lecture Notes
  • Rajesh Gopakumar (HRI, Allahabad and ICTS) "Vector Models at large N and Holography"  Lecture Notes
  • Alex Maloney (McGill University) "AdS/CFT, Quantum Entanglement and Quantum Gravity"  Lecture 1, Lecture 2,Lecture 3
  • Kabir Ramola (Brandeis University) "Extreme Value Statistics and Some Applications to Disordered Systems"  Lecture Notes
  • Sanjib Sabhapandit (Raman Research Institute, Bangalore ) "Fluctuations and large deviations in nonequilibrium systems"  Lecture Notes
  • Peter Weichman (BAE Systems) "Geophysical Fluid Dynamics: A Statistical Physics Laboratory"  Lecture Notes 
  • Paul Chesler (Harvard University) "Gravitational collapse, holography, and hydrodynamics in extreme conditions"  Lecture Notes

Student Speakers:

  • Cesar Agón (Brandeis University) "Entanglement Entropy in Quantum Field Theory and Holography"  Lecture Notes
  • Benjamin Hancock (Brandeis University) "Pressure and Self-Propelled Particles"  Lecture Notes
  • Carl Merrigan (Brandeis University) "KEP Model for Soft Glassy Materials"  Lecture Notes
  • Lishibanya Mohapatra (Brandeis University) "How cells control the size of their organelles"  Lecture Notes
Spring 2015


Wednesday, April 22, 2015
Sho Yaida, Duke University
Panoramic correlations in glassy systems


Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Maxim Braverman (Northeastern University) 
Berry phase and the phase of the determinant

Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Brad Marston, Brown University
The Quantum and Fluid Mechanics of Climate Change

February 04, 2015 
Anatoli Polkovnikov, BU
Emergent non-adiabatic dynamics and geometric response in interacting systems

January 21, 2015 
Bard Ermentrout, University of Pittsburgh
Keeping the beat : Homeostatic frequency control in coupled oscillators
 

Fall 2014

December 3 - December 5, 2014

Peter Sarnak, Institute for Advanced Study and Princeton University
Eisenbud Lectures
Theme: "Randomness in Number Theory and Geometry"

November 13, 2014
Ryan Grady, Boston University
Applications of quantum field theory to geometry and topology: observables and index theory

October 15, 2014
Ben Allen, Emanuel College and Harvard University
Title: "An Information-Theoretic Formalism for Multiscale Structure in Complex Systems"

October 01, 2014
Daniel Goldstein, Brandeis University
Title: "How Many Timescales Can I Fit into the Brusselator

September 17,  2014
Jessica Lowell, (Computer Science), Brandeis University
Title: "The evolution of modularity in neural networks

September 3, 2014
Igert Kickoff Meeting
Summer Institute 2014


July 9,  2014

Yair Shokef, Tel Aviv University
Title: "
Confinement Effects on the Jamming Transition in Kinetically-Constrained Models"


June 16 - June 27
Igert Summer Institute, Brandeis University
Subject matter/speakers:
*Chris Santangelo (U Mass Amherst)-- "Shape and mechanics of origami folding"
*Matthew Headrick -- "Introduction of quantum information theory"
*Bulbul Chakraborty and Blake Lebaron -- "Applications of Statistical Mechanics to Finance"
*Daniel Ruberman -- "Introduction to Knot Theory"
*Paul Miller -- "Feedback control in neural firing"
*Albion Lawrence -- "An introduction to inflation and gravity waves". This last speech was for a very general audience and  explained the recent excitement surrounding the BICEP2 experiment.
In addition,  student seminars by Eli Putzig (Physics), Honi Sanders (Neuroscience), and Tony Ng (Neuroscience).

Spring 2014


Spring 2014
Igert Course held: "Differential Geometry in Classical and Quantum Mechanics"


March 26, 2014
Daniel Ruberman, Brandeis, Dept. of Mathematics
Title: "Chern-Weil theory and Chern-Simons invariants"


February 12, 2014
Richard M. Ellis, Umass Amherst
Title: "From Large Deviations to Statistical Mechanics: What Is the Most Likely Way for an Unlikely Event To Happen?"


January 29, 2014
Prof. Sophia Malamud, Dept. Computer Science, Brandeis University
Title: "Language as rational behaviour under uncertainty: applications of Decision Theory"


January 22, 2014
Prof. Albion Lawrence, Brandeis University
Title: "Higgs and hierarchy: the science behind the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics"
Fall 2013

December 04, 2013

Yaneer Bar-Yam, Lawrence Albion, NECSI
Title: "The Global Financial and Food Crisis: A Complex Systems Science Analysis"

November 20, 2013
Lawrence Albion, Michael Hagan, Blake LeBaron
Title: ""The science behind the 2013 Nobel Prizes"

October 30, 2013
Pavel Sountsov, Brandeis University
Title: "Statistical mechanics and statistical inference"

October 23, 2013
Patrick Charbenneau, Duke University
Title: ""A soft-matter perspective on protein crystallization"

October 22, 2013
Patrick Charbonneau, Duke University
Colloquium sponsored by Igert
Title: "High-dimensional surprises near the glass and the jamming transitions"

October 2, 2013
Prof. Shamit Kachru, Standford University
Title: "Moonshine and Supersymmetric String Compactifications"

September 25, 2013
David Huse, Princeton University
"Eigenstate phase transitions and localization-protected order"

September 24, 2013
Physics Colloquium, sponsored by Igert
David Huse, Princeton University
"Thermalization and localization in quantum statistical mechanics"

September 4, 2013
 Igert Group Meeting
Agenda: "Discuss goals and opportunities in coming year"
Summer Institute 2013

July 31 - August 9, 2013

"Geometry and Dynamics Summer Institute"

Lecturers:

Parongama Sen, (University of Calcutta, Kolkata), lecturing on applications of statistical physics to social science problems.
Henry Cohn (Microsoft Research, New England), lecturing on symmetry and optimization.
Ben Allen (Emmanuel College and Harvard), lecturing on evolutionary dynamics
Paul Miller, (Brandeis), lecturing on aspects of theoretical neuroscience.
Blake LeBaron (Brandeis), lecturing on empirical puzzles in financial data, and applications of agent-based modeling.
Albion Lawrence (Brandeis), lecturing on fiber bundles ("gauge theory") and their applications to deformable bodies (falling cats, swimming bacteria).

In addition, seminars by IGERT students:

Sumantra Sarkar, Physics Dept., Brandeis University, "Origin of Rigidity in Dry Granular Solids"
Blake Stacey, Physics Dept., Brandeis University, "Mesoscale Structure in Complex Networks”
Danny Goldstein, Physics Dept., Brandeis University, TBA
Spring 2013


May 15, 2013

Justin Kinney, Cold Springs Harbor Laboratory
Title: "Quantum field theories for modeling biochemical systems"

May 08, 2013
Raul Kulkarni, Umass Boston
Tiitle: "Stochastic gene expression and queueing theory: analytical results and application"

April 25, 2013
Women in Science Seminar
Thseh-Hwan Yong, Threla Cosmetics
Title: Science Entrepreneurship

April 17, 2013
Art of Science Lecture Series
Debbie Chacra,   Professor, Olin College of Engineering
Info at: http://www.brandeis.edu/programs/wgs/news/womeninscience.html

April 10, 2013
IGERT Seminar
Claudio Chamon, Boston University
"Renyi entropies as a measure of the complexity of counting problems"

March 20, 2013
IGERT Seminar
Pietro Dindo, University of Pisa
Title: "Evolution and market behavior with endogenous rules"
Paper1: http://www.brandeis.edu/igert/images/documents/pietro2011.pdf
Paper2: http://www.brandeis.edu/igert/images/documents/pietro2012b.pdf

March 13, 2013
Art of Science Lecture Series
Dianna Dabby,   Professor, Olin College of Engineering
Title: "Creating Musical Variation - from Chaos"
Info at: http://www.brandeis.edu/programs/wgs/news/womeninscience.html

February 06, 2013
IGERT Seminar
Olivier Bernardi,  Brandeis University, Dept. of Mathematics
Title: "Random colored lattices"
Fall 2012


October 28, 2012

IGERT Seminar
Tom Butler, MIT
Title: "Universal Critical Dynamics in High Resolution Neuronal Avalanche Data"

October 24, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Royce Zia, Virginia Tech
Title: "Survival of the Weakest? Lessons from studies of many competing species in general and four cyclic competitor in particular"

October 03, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Tony Ng, Dept. of Neuroscience, Brandeis University.
Title: "Criticality in neuronal networks: Existing evidence and models"

September 19, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Blake Stacey, Dept. of Physics, Brandeis University
"Community Formation in Nonequilibrium Spatial Ecosystems"
Spring 2012

July 03, 2012

IGERT Seminar
Debashish Chowdhury, Physics Dep., Indian Institute of Technology
"Stochastic kinetics of template-directed bio-polymerization: machines and mechanisms"

April 25, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Taylor Hughes, UIUC
"Torsion and Viscosity in Condensed Matter Physics"

April 18, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Dr. Alvaro Sanchez, MIT
"Evolution and ecology in a feedback loop: consequences of social and antisocial behavior in microbial communities"

April 04, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Jordan Pollack, Brandeis University (Computer Science)
"Beyond Competition: Progress in Co-evolutionary Learning"

March 21, 2012
IGERT Seminar
 Susan Coppersmith, U. of Wisconsin, Madison
"Quantum random walks of interacting particles and the graph isomorphism problem."

March 14, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Patrick Hayden, McGill University
"Towards the fast scrambling conjecture"

March 07, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Matthew Headrick, Brandeis University
"Some basic aspects of quantum information theory"

March 05, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Takashi Odagaki, Dept. of Physics, Tokyo Denki University
"The 99%: Who is to blame?"

February 24, 2012
IGERT Seminar
David Sivak, Lawrence Berkley national Laboratory
"The 99%: Who is to blame?"February 15, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Albion Lawrence, Brandeis University
"An Introduction to Information and Entropy"
Fall 2012

October 28, 2012

IGERT Seminar
Tom Butler, MIT
Title: "Universal Critical Dynamics in High Resolution Neuronal Avalanche Data"

October 24, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Royce Zia, Virginia Tech
Title: "Survival of the Weakest? Lessons from studies of many competing species in general and four cyclic competitor in particular"

October 03, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Tony Ng, Dept. of Neuroscience, Brandeis University.
Title: "Criticality in neuronal networks: Existing evidence and models"

September 19, 2012
IGERT Seminar
Blake Stacey, Dept. of Physics, Brandeis University
"Community Formation in Nonequilibrium Spatial Ecosystems"
Fall 2011

December 07, 2011

IGERT Seminar
Max Bi, Brandeis University
The statistical mechanics of granular matter"

December 01, 2011
Eisenbud Lecture 2
Jennifer Chayes, Microsoft Research New England
"The Mathematics of Dynamic Random Networks"

November 29, 2011
Eisenbud Lecture 1
Jennifer Chayes, Microsoft Research New England
"The Mathematics of Dynamic Random Networks"

November 16, 2011
IGERT Seminar
Matthew Graham, Brandeis University
"Knots, invariants and how a low dimensional geometric topologist thinks"

November 9, 2011
IGERT Seminar
David Lazer,  Northeastern University
"How we think together: the role of networks in collective problem solving" 

October 19, 2011
IGERT Seminar
Paul Miller, Brandeis University
"Leaning to solve cognitive tasks: global function from local rules"