Call for Proposals

Dear Colleagues,

I invite you to consider teaching a Summer 2019 Justice Brandeis Semester (JBS)!

Summer Justice Brandeis Semesters are integrated, immersive academic programs, in which small groups of students explore a topic in depth while working closely with faculty and earning 12-credits (or three courses) . The program sets Brandeis apart from its peers through its distinctive experiential learning communities.

About JBS Programs

  • Small groups of students (ideally 12-15) explore a topic in depth through coursework and experiential learning activities, including field trips, guest speakers, and project-based learning.  JBS programs can be interdisciplinary explorations or focused on a single academic field.
  • JBS programs run for 10 weeks; each four-credit course meets for at least 40 class contact hours during that time. Students are expected to complete an additional 140 hours of coursework outside the classroom for each four-credit course in the JBS.
  • Faculty Eligibility:  All faculty with at least three years of teaching experience (two of which are at Brandeis) are invited to teach in a JBS. This invitation includes emeriti/emerita and adjunct and part-time faculty, as well as tenured, tenure track, and contract faculty. While JBS programs can be taught by a single faculty, they are very well-suited to being team taught.

If you want to learn more about proposing and teaching a JBS program, or need guidance on crafting your proposal, please contact Phil Dolan (phil@brandeis.edu) in the Brandeis Summer School Office or click on the program guidelines at https://www.brandeis.edu/jbs/faculty/proposalguidelines.html. The deadline to submit a proposal for Summer 2019 is Friday, September 28, 2018.

JBS programs are remarkable experiences for students and faculty alike, and I hope that you will consider offering one in the near future.

Sincerely,

Dorothy L. Hodgson, Ph.D.
Dean of Arts and Sciences
Professor of Anthropology
Brandeis University

How can I teach a JBS?

Explore this Justice Brandeis Semester (JBS) faculty webpage for more information on the Call for Proposals, and Sample Draft Proposals. Proposals for Summer 2019 are due no later than Friday, Sept. 28, 2018.

If you want to learn more about proposing and teaching a JBS program, or need guidance on crafting your proposal, please get in touch with Phil Dolan (phil@brandeis.edu) or Elaine Wong (ewong@brandeis.edu), well in advance of the deadline.

All JBS proposals will be submitted first to the Justice Brandeis Semester committee for "pre-approval," before submissions go to the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee and Dean of Arts and Sciences for final approval. Please send proposals to Phil Dolan (phil@brandeis.edu), Associate Director, Brandeis Summer School and Elaine Wong (ewong@brandeis.edu), in an e-mail attachment by Sept. 28, 2018. All proposals must address the items listed in the proposal format, which is included in the online Proposal Guidelines.


Other considerations:

  • Faculty Remuneration:  Please contact Phil Dolan, Associate Director of the Summer School, for more information.
  • JBS programs can be interdisciplinary explorations or focused on a single academic field.
  • JBS proposals which involve sustained domestic or international travel will require a longer lead time to insure that safety and logistics are thoroughly reviewed by appropriate University offices. Note that such proposals may need to be submitted as early as 18 months in advance of the anticipated program start date.

“Teaching a JBS in Ethnographic Research was undoubtedly one of the best teaching experiences I have had.  The opportunity to work with the same group of students in a much more sustained way on shared readings, discussions, and activities, and at the same time to supervise each one in their individual projects was challenging, but also felt like the way teaching should always be.”

- Elizabeth Ferry, Professor of Anthropology

“Doing a program like this one, so early on in my academic career at Brandeis, is one of those key interactions that I feel has changed my academic trajectory. I can honestly say I had no idea what my future looked like at the end of my spring semester, but I know for a fact that being present for the past weeks has made a difference in where I feel I am now going.”

 - Aja Antoine ‘17