QR Curricular Oversight Committee 2014-2015

Susan Parker (Chair), Mathematics

Linda Bui, Economics

David Cunningham, Sociology

Govind Sreenivasan, History

Palle Yourgrau, Philosophy

Quantitative Reasoning

The quantitative reasoning requirement has been established to develop students' abilities to collect, summarize, and analyze numerical data; to make abstract concepts operational; and to think critically about the accuracy and soundness of conclusions based on data or on mathematical models.Quantitative reasoning courses usually embed methodological training in their subject matter. These courses vary widely in the skills that are emphasized,but they usually include one or more of the following:

A. Learning to read, construct, interpret, and evaluate tables, graphs, and charts.

B. Developing quantitative measures of physical, behavioral,or social phenomena.

C. Using mathematical models to express causal relationships and to explore the implications of changed assumptions or proposed solutions to problems in the physical or social world.

D. Collecting and organizing numerical data from archives, surveys, lab experiments, or other sources.

E. Testing hypotheses using experimental or statistical controls.

F. Assessing the limitations of research, such as there liability and validity of measures, adequacy of experimental design, sample size and quality, and alternative hypotheses and interpretations.

Each Brandeis undergraduate is required to take one course from the approved list of quantitative reasoning courses. This list may change, so students should consult the most recent list of approved courses in the Course Schedule to assure that they will receive requirement credit.(Naturally, students will not be denied credit retroactively if a course taken to fulfill the requirement is later dropped from the list.)

For a list of courses that satisfy the quantitative reasoning requirement please visit the following site: Quantitative Reasoning Requirement.