ACADEMIC INTERNSHIP COURSES

By combining an internship with a Brandeis Internship course you will foster a richer perspective of theory, skills, and careers by aligning pedagogy, writings, and group discussions directly with the responsibilities and observations conducted in the field.  

Internship Course types/definitions:

89 a/b Internship Seminars

92 a/b Independent Internship & Analysis 

93 a Independent Research Internship

INT 92g One-Credit Summer Internship Course

Internship Requirements

In order to be eligible for an internship course, an internship must

-Last 100 hours over 10 weeks (fall/spring) or 6 weeks during the summer

-Have faculty approval before internship begins

-Be paid or unpaid

-Have a rigorous academic component (designed by a faculty)

-Not be used for multiple internship courses

*Full UCC Guidelines Document

Forms

92 a/b Add Form

93 a Add Form

INT 92g Internship Approval Form

Transcript Notation

BUS 89 a/b Internship Information Form

Internship Credit Options by Department/Program


Brandeis encourages you supplement an internship experience with an academic internship course. Diverse 4-credit internship courses are available and vary by program.  While internship courses approach the internship experience differently and vary by discipline, the strength of the Brandeis experience stems from hands-on faculty guidance and academic rigor.

Over 28 Majors/Minors offer a 4-credit Internship Course Option:

Normal enrollment procedures and deadlines apply. To enroll, refer to the Registration & Enrollment information on the Registrar's Website
  • If you don't see a major/minor listed and you're interested in internship credit talk to the specific program UAH to find more information about other possible ways to think about internship credit.  
  • For general information about Internship Credit, including requirements and information for international students visit our Academic Internships home page.

Expand All / Collapse All


American Studies (Major)

-AMST 92A Internship in American Studies
Off-campus work experience in conjunction with a reading course with a member of the department. Requires reading and writing assignments drawing upon and amplifying the internship experience. Only one internship course may be submitted in satisfaction of the department's elective requirements. Usually offered every year.
Faculty resources include Professor Cohen, Professor Antler

Anthropology (Major)

-ANTH 92A Internship and Analysis

Students may take no more than one departmental internship for credit.

The department sponsors internships for junior and senior majors and minors. Internships combine off-campus and on-campus work that provides a significant anthropological learning experience and academic study supervised by a departmental faculty sponsor. Majors may substitute one internship for the ninth elective course option. Students doing summer internships register for course credit in the following fall semester. A minimum GPA of B+ in anthropology courses is required for eligibility. For additional information, see the Guidelines for Anthropology Internships, available from the undergraduate adviser. Usually offered every year.
Staff

Faculty resources include Professor Lamb, Professor Ferry, Professor Urcid


Biochemistry

-BCHM 93a Research Internship and Analysis
Supervised research experience in a Brandeis University laboratory. In consultation with a Brandeis Biochemistry department faculty member, the student will design and execute an individual research project, culminating in an oral and written presentation. Usually offered every year.
Faculty resources include Professor Gregory Petsko

Biology (Major)

-BIOL 93a Research Internship and Analysis

Supervised biological research experience in a Brandeis University laboratory. In consultation with a Brandeis faculty member, the student will design and execute an individual research project, culminating in an oral and written presentation. Students seeking to do biology research in Brandeis laboratories outside the biology department must obtain sponsorship of a biology department faculty member as well as permission of the departmental undergraduate advising head (UAH). This course is not intended to and will not provide credit for off-campus internships. BIOL 93a is offered both semesters but is a one-semester course and may be taken only once. Students must petition the department for permission to enroll in BIOL 93a. Course requirements include laboratory research, a written report and an oral presentation, as specified in the BIOL 93a petition. Students wishing to do a summer internship for academic credit must: obtain permission from their biology department sponsor prior to commencing the internship; complete the summer internship (a minimum of 10 weeks full-time); and complete the appropriate academic work. Credit will be awarded via the student enrolling BIOL 93a in the subsequent fall term. BIOL 93a may also be used as one of the two courses needed for Senior Research (see BIOL 99). Usually offered every semester.

Faculty resources include Professor Joan Press


Business (Major/Minor)

-BUS 89a Work in the Global Business Environment Internship Seminar

 
Students interested in taking a BUS internship for credit should consult the description and enrollment information for BUS 89a site for business internships: www.brandeis.edu/programs/pages/bus.html.  BUS (or ECON) students who wish to do internship courses should enroll in BUS 89a. BUS 89a is a four-credit course and can satisfy the second category of BUS electives. Most BUS 89a students do their internships in the same semester they enroll for the classes (usually spring), but internships can also be done during a prior academic semester or summer. Offered fall and spring. Students may not take this course twice.

Faculty resources include Professor Suderow, Professor Du Pont, Professor Bayonne


Classical Studies (Major/Minor)

-CLAS 92a Independent Internship and Analysis
The Classical Studies department encourages internships for those who want an off-campus, hands-on experience working in an environment that enables students to connect their studies of Classical Studies with real-world experience. Students arrange their own internships. You may apply only one semester of CLAS 92a toward fulfilling the requirements of the CLAS major or minor.

Classical Studies also offers the CLARC (Classics Artifact Research Center) formal, on-campus, internship program for three undergraduates each academic year. The internship comprises a year-long class, as interns work with, research, and document the ancient artifacts in CLARC on campus. Each intern must be a Classical Studies major able to meet during the fall and spring semesters for 4 hours each week for a total of 100 hours. The course (92a/b) earns 2 credit units per semester. Students must complete both semesters to earn the 4 credits.  Each spring, the new interns are announced at the end of April.

Faculty resources include Professor Ann Kolowski-Ostrow


Computer Science (Major/Minor)

-COSI 93a Research Internship and Analysis

Provides students with an opportunity to work in a computer science research lab for one semester, pursuing a project that has the potential to produce new scientific results. Students and the faculty member mutually design a project for the semester that supports the research agenda of the group. Students must attend all research group meetings and present their findings in oral and written form at the end of the semester. The project typically includes background research, some lab work, and collaboration with other group members. Course requires signature of the instructor, is subject to the availability of undergraduate research positions, and is typically open only to juniors and seniors.

Staff

Faculty resources include Professor Tim Hickey, Professor Mitch Cherniak


Education Studies (Major/Minor)

-ED 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis

Students may substitute successful completion of an essay, thesis, or internship, as described below, for the sixth elective course option: Internship: an internship (ED 92a/b) approved by the director of the education program. (Students who are student teaching in the education program will also be eligible to receive internship credit if they are concurrently pursuing an education studies minor.) Students who choose this option will keep a journal about their experiences and produce a final paper.

Faculty resources include Professor Marya Levenson


Environmental Studies (Major/Minor)

-ENVS 89a Environmental Internship Seminar

Individually tailored internships place students in an extensive network of government, public interest, and industry groups in the Boston area and beyond, working alongside environmental professionals in the field. One capstone experience: ENVS 89a (Environmental Internship), ENVS 97a (Senior Essay), or an approved senior honors thesis submitted to any department. The environmental internship is strongly recommended.

ENVS 89a is offered during the fall and spring during the academic year, and through the Summer School for those doing a summer internship.

Faculty resources include Professor Laura Goldin


Fine Arts (Major)

-FA 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis

Students may apply in the spring semester for internships, of one- and two-semester commitment, for the following academic year at the Rose Art Museum. Focus may center in the areas of education, registrar, exhibition installation, or curatorial work. All student applications, with preference given to upperclassmen, must be endorsed by a faculty recommendation. The Rose Art Museum staff interviews and decides upon the interns. Usually offered every semester.

Faculty resources include Professor Nancy Scott, Professor Peter Kalb


French and Francophone Studies

-FREN 92a Internship

May be taken with the written permission of the Undergraduate Advising Head. 
Combines on- or off-campus internship experience related to French and Francophone studies with written analysis under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. Students arrange their own internships. Counts only once toward the fulfillment of requirements for the major or the minor. Usually offered every semester.


Film and Visual Media Studies (Major/Minor)

-FILM 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis


Students must complete six courses:

A. Core course: FILM 100a (Introduction to the Moving Image).

B. Five additional courses from the approved film studies curriculum,(which includes FILM 92a/b Internship in Film Studies) which must include one course in a non-American cinema and one course in some creative aspect of film production.

Faculty resources include Professor Alice Kelikian, Professor Mark Delello


Health, Science, & Social Policy (Major)

-HSSP 89a Internship Seminar
All students will be required to take four core courses plus a “hands-on experience,” a senior seminar, and elective requirements which vary for the BA and the BS degrees. To fulfill the "hands-on experience" requirement, students must complete either HSSP 89a, HSSP 98a or b, HSSP 99d, or WMGS 92a.

HSSP 89a Internship and Analysis (Open only to HSSP majors)
A supervised internship in a health care or policy organization. Internship placement must be approved by the HSSP internship instructor and should focus on some aspect of health and public service. Students are required to attend a biweekly internship course and submit a twenty-to-twenty-five-page research paper relating to their internship.

Faculty resources include Professor Cynthia Schampl, Professor Peter Conrad, Professor Sarita Bahlotra


Hispanic Studies

-HISP 92a/b: Internship in Hispanic Studies

Written permission of the Undergraduate Advising Head required. Students may take no more than one departmental internship for major credit.

Internships combine off-campus and on-campus work, supervised by a departmental faculty sponsor, that provides a significant learning experience in Hispanic cultural academic study. Students doing summer internships register for course credit in the following fall semester. Junior or Senior Hispanic Studies majors with a minimum GPA of 3.5 in Hispanic Studies courses may substitute one internship for the ninth elective course option. Usually offered every year.
Faculty resources include Professor Jeronimo Arellano, Professor Dian Fox



History

-HIST 92a: Internships in History

The goal is to provide greater opportunities to apply your history major or minor to the real world—to have an opportunity to sharpen your research, analytical, and writing skills and to enhance your credentials when you leave Brandeis and embark on a career. The internships will vary considerably, depending on your background, interests, and opportunities. You can draw on the rich database of internships at Hiatt:

http://www.brandeis.edu/hiatt/search/internship/exchange.html

You should also consult your academic advisor in the History Department. Faculty learn about internships all the time—such as the George Washington summer internship and the Dead Sea Scroll Exhibition at the Museum of Science. The internships might be during the regular academic year or in the summer. All internships for course credit require some written work and include some historical dimension (e.g., a background paper on the history of the organization or issue that is the focus of the internship). The History Department will allow one internship to count toward the course requirements for a major or minor. To qualify for course credit, you must submit the standard 92a form:

http://www.brandeis.edu/registrar/forms/docs/forms/92_add.pdf


International & Global Studies (Major)

-IGS 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis
Students in the IGS program participate in an experiential learning opportunity to meet the "International Experience" requirement. Most usually satisfy this requirement by studying abroad or completing an international internship at an organization concerned with the central issues of the IGS major.

If extended international residence would be a hardship, IGS students should meet with the IGS Internship Coordinator to discuss a domestic internship and its suitability for the IGS International Experience requirement BEFORE the internship begins.

Students interested in internships should contact the Internship Coordinator about possible credit arrangements for that semester.

Faculty resources include Professor Chandler Rosenberg (Chair), Professor Laura Goldin (Internship Coordinator)


Italian Studies

-ITAL 92a Internship in Italian Studies
May be taken with the written permission of the Undergraduate Advising Head. 
Combines on- or off-campus internship experience related to Italian Studies with written analysis under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. This may include study-abroad documented projects. Students arrange their own internships. Counts only once toward the fulfillment of requirements for the Minor or the Independent Major. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

Journalism (Minor)

-JOUR 89a: Contemporary Media & Internship

Students are required to do one of the three following options:

  1. write a research paper for a one-semester senior independent study in the Journalism Program
  2. write an honors thesis in the student's department of concentration on a topic relating to the media, or
  3. serve in an outside internship while taking the related internship course in the Journalism Program (JOUR 89a).
Any student wanting to earn academic credit by enrolling in JOUR 89 MUST receive prior approval from Program Director Professor Farrelly.
Faculty Resources include Professor Maura Farrelly, Professor Eileen McNamara

Latin American and Latino Studies (Major/Minor)

-LALS 92a Internship

Combines off-campus experience in a Latin America-related internship with written analysis under the supervision of a faculty sponsor. Students arrange their own internships. Counts only once toward fulfillment of requirements for the major or the minor.

Faculty resources inclue Professor Fernando Rosenberg, Professor Dian Fox


Legal Studies (Minor)

-LGLS 89a Internship Seminar

Students are required to complete either of the following:

A senior thesis in the student's major, supervised by the major department, which includes some aspect of law and is approved by the LGLS Director.

An internship arranged through the program office and the correlative seminar, LGLS 89a (Law and Society Internship Seminar.

This is an experiential learning course. Prerequisites: LGLS 10a and one other LGLS course or permission of the instructor. To obtain an internship, students must discuss their placements with the LGLS internship director by April 1 for fall term internships or by November 1 for spring term internships. This course may not be repeated for credit.
A biweekly class, a supervised law-related internship in a public agency or nonprofit organization, and a related research paper. Internships are twice per week for not more than 15 hours per week. Examples of internship activities include investigating discrimination cases, negotiating between consumers and small business, and attending criminal and family courts. Internships must be arranged through the program administrator. Usually offered every semester.


Ms. StimellFaculty resources include Professor Melissa Stimell, Professor Richard Gaskins


Near Eastern & Judaic Studies (Major/Minor

-NEJS 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis

The NEJS Department encourages students to participate in internships that integrate academic knowledge and practical experiences. It sponsors credit-bearing internships (NEJS 92) for junior and senior majors and minors. Students may count one NEJS 92 toward their major or minor. Students doing summer internships may register for course credit in the following fall semester. A minimum of a B+ grade point average in NEJS courses is required for eligibility.

Faculty resources include Professor Jonathan Sarna, Professor Jonathan Decter, Professor Sharon Feinman Nemser


Peace, Conflict & Coexistence Studies (Minor)

-PAX 92a/b Internship & Analysis

Students must complete either PAX 92a/b (Internship in Peace, Conflict, and Coexistence Studies) or a senior honors thesis. The internship consists of at least 10 hours a week in a social change organization in the greater Boston area or, if the student is abroad, an appropriate equivalent. 

Faculty Resources include Professor Gordie Fellman


Physics

-PHYS 93a Independent Research and Analysis Internship

The Physics Department faculty occasionally supervise a 93a Research Internship with appropriate research topics and opportunities.

Faculty resources include Professor David Roberts, Professor John Wardle


Politics

Pol 89A: Political Science Internship

Note: Students must have an approved internship either before or concurrent with the class.  Instructor’s signature required.  Please contact the instructor, Ryan LaRochelle (larochel@brandeis.edu) for a form, which must be filled out and approved before students are permitted to enroll in the course. 

What can you do with a degree in politics?  The political science internship allows students to gain practical experience about the job market and test potential avenues for future employment.  This is a unique opportunity for students to apply the knowledge they have learned in the classroom to the everyday practice of politics.  In an increasingly congested job market, internships help students build their resumes and learn skills that will ease their post-graduation transition.  Students in the seminar will spend approximately 100 hours over the course of the semester at their internship sites.  The course allows to learn about careers in state and local governments and congressional offices, advocacy groups, non-profits, non-governmental organizations (NGOs), legal offices, media outlets, and numerous other organizations.  Course readings inform students’ understandings of how political scientists analyze these various institutions. Weekly seminar meetings and assignments tie students’ field work back to the broader study of politics and political science.  The seminar is organized around a fundamental question in the discipline: Can academic political science and its theories and empirics help us understand and practice real-world politics?  Throughout the course will we examine whether political scientists can do a better job of informing citizens and improve the practice of democracy. 

In addition to their work at their internship sites, students in the course are required to submit an evaluation by their internship supervisor, complete a daily log and journal of their work in the field, write a term paper that evaluates the applicability of political science research to a question or problem at their internship site, and present their paper in class.


Psychology (Major)

-PSYC 92a/b Independent Internship; PSYC 93a Research Internship

Psychology offers a year-long practicum placement in a mental-health agency, PSYC 161a/b.

PSYC additionally offers PSYC 92a/b Independent Internships and Analysis and PSYC 93a Independent Research Internship as one of the electives for the major.

Faculty resources include Professor Joeseph Cunningham, Professor Ellen Wright, Professor Angela Gutchess


Social Justice & Social Policy (Minor)

-SJSP 89a Social Justice Social Policy Internship Seminar

This is an experiential learning course. To obtain an internship for the fall term, students must discuss their placements with the SJSP internship instructor by April 1.

Supervised internship in a social justice, social service, social policy, or social research organization. Students will meet as a group and will complete research assignments. Usually offered every year in the fall semester.
Ms. Stimell

 Faculty resources include Professor David Cunningham, Professor Melissa Stimell


Sociology (Major)

-SOC 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis

The Department of Sociology offers individualized credit-bearing internships for majors through SOC 92b: Internship and Analysis in Sociology. Students generally pursue internship credit in their junior or senior years, after they have completed several courses in the major.

Faculty resources include Professor Laura Miller, Professor Sara Shostak


Theater Arts (Major/Minor)

-THA 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis

Theater Arts requires practicum and also offers THA 92 Independent Internship & Analysis. (All THA students completing internships for credit must enroll in this seminar.) This seminar continues the process of experiential learning through the completion of various projects that utilize the resources of the professional theaters in the Boston area.

Faculty resources include Professor Jen Cleary, Professor Adrienne Krystansky


Women's & Gender Studies (Major/Minor)

-WMGS 89a/b When Violence Hits Home Internship Seminar in Violence Against Women and Children;

The Women's and Gender Studies program offers a seminar and internship course, WMGS 89a: When Violence Hits Home: Internship Seminar. 

This is an experiential learning course. 
Combines fieldwork in domestic and sexual violence prevention programs with a fortnightly seminar exploring cultural and interpersonal facets of violence from a feminist perspective. Topics include theories, causes and prevention of rape, battering, child abuse, and animal abuse. Internships provide practical experience in local organizations such as rape crisis, battered women's violence prevention, and child abuse prevention programs. Usually offered every fall.
Ms. Hunter

Faculty resources include Professor Deirdre Hunter, Professor Susan Lanser, Professor Jim Mandrell

-WMGS 92a/b Independent Internship and Analysis

Students are strongly encouraged to undertake an internship in women’s and gender studies as one of their electives. Students pursuing an internship for semester credit must spend 8 hours per week engaged in significant work within a setting that can provide focus on women, gender, and/or sexuality.

For academic internships related to other topics, students identify an internship site of interest and a faculty mentor and enroll in WMGS 92b Independent Internship & Analysis. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

Faculty resources include Professor Deirdre Hunter, Professor Susan Lanser, Professor Jim Mandrell