Linking

By making a hyperlink descriptive and unique, you can improve its accessibility. A link should always be embedded within text and make sense out of context.

Description

Linking descriptive words helps a visitor understand what they will experience by clicking on the link.

Incorrect: Brandeis Tickets is a centralized on-campus box office operated by Brandeis staff and students. Click here: http://www.brandeis.edu/tickets

CorrectBrandeis Tickets is a centralized on-campus box office operated by Brandeis staff and students.

You may be tempted to use "here" or "click here" in the text of a link. When you fill your page with "click here" links, a sighted user has to reread the surrounding text to determine which link is which. 

Reimagine the same scenario for a user of a screen reader. She has listened to the whole page and now wants to visit a link she heard a while back. Her screen reader can read a list of all links on the page. Except, on your page, she hears a list like this:

Which one was it? She has no choice but to listen to the content from the beginning. The result is a frustrated user or worse — a user who leaves your site or document.

Unique

Links on a single page should be unique. For example, you should not have two instances of the words "Register Now" and have them go to different locations. A visitor using a screen reader won't be able to differentiate between the two links. 

Incorrect:
Research Conference - May 11
Register Now

Writing Conference - June 9
Register Now

Correct:
Research Conference - May 11
Register Now for the Research Conference

Writing Conference - June 9
Register Now for the Writing Conference