Philosophy of Education Research Colloquia


Fall 2005

REFLECTIONS ON THE YIDDISH SECULAR SCHOOLS: A STUDY OF ETHNIC EDUCATION WITHIN A MAINSTREAM CULTURE
Sandra Aliza Parker, (September 29, 2005)

Abstract: An examination of the four Yiddish secular school movements in the United States---the Farband, The International Workers’ Order, the Sholem Aleichem, and the Workmen Circle (Socialist) from an educational rather than a socio-economic or ideological perspective. I argue that initial ideological differences, such as cultural versus territorial nationalism, Yiddish versus Hebrew, and political identification prevented the movements from making a united effort to develop the materials, methods, and structures that might have enabled the Yiddish schools to continue and to offer a qualitative ethnic education. Data on Yiddish secular schools seem to indicate that ethnicity need not be a divisive force in a heterogeneous society. Aspects of Yiddish secular schooling with relevance to all ethnic groups will be noted.  Finally, I argue that the quality of American society might be improved through the preservation of ethnic education.
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CONNECTING BRAIN AND MIND TO EDUCATION
Kurt W. Fischer, (November 3, 2005)

Abstract: In the current Age of Biology, society is looking to neuroscience, genetics, and cognitive science to inform and improve education. Scientists and scholars need to take responsibility for building strong connections of mind, brain, and education to provide usable research-based knowledge for education. One important arena for building such connections is research on measurement of what students learn and teachers teach.
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