Department of Chemistry

Last updated: July 28, 2014 at 4:40 p.m.

Objectives

Undergraduate Major
The chemistry major offers broad training in modern chemistry, covering the major subfields—biochemistry, inorganic, organic, and physical—and at the same time allows students to pursue their special interest(s). Chemistry is the central science and the chemistry major provides a solid preparation for professional work in chemistry and allied fields; for study at the graduate level in chemistry and in other related fields (biochemistry, environmental science, pharmacology, polymer science, etc.); for professional schools (e.g., medicine, dentistry); and for developing an understanding of the technological and scientific issues challenging our society today—useful professionally in law and business, as well as in everyday life. Chemistry majors are given the opportunity to develop extensive, practical experience through laboratory courses using macro- and microscale techniques. Chemistry majors are encouraged to participate in independent research, which is an important part of a scientific education.

Graduate Program in Chemistry
The graduate program in chemistry, leading to the MA, MS, and PhD degrees, includes course work, seminar participation, research, and teaching, and is designed to lead to a broad understanding of the subject. Entering students may be admitted to either the master’s or the doctoral program. All students will be required to demonstrate knowledge in advanced areas of chemistry. The doctoral program is designed to be flexible so that individual programs of study may be devised to satisfy the particular interests and needs of each student. In each case, this program will be decided by joint consultation between the student, the graduate studies committee, and the thesis supervisor, when selected. The doctoral program will normally include advanced courses in the student’s own area of interest, to be supplemented by suitable courses in other areas of chemistry and, where appropriate, biochemistry, biology, computer science, mathematics, and physics.

Learning Goals

Chemistry, often referred to as the “Central Science”, examines the world at the molecular level, allowing us to understand how we interact with plants, animals and humans through agriculture, biology and medicine, and with the physical world through electronics, new materials and new sources of energy. In gaining an understanding of natural phenomena at the molecular level, chemists develop methods to command these phenomena, connecting chemistry with many disciplines including physics, mathematics, earth and environmental sciences, biology, and medicine. Put concisely, the Central Science impacts our planet by protecting and preserving our health, ecology, culture and heritage.

Chemistry majors develop extensive practical experience through laboratory courses, using both macro- and microscale techniques. Honors students participate in independent research, and virtually all majors take advantage of research opportunities, a critical part of a scientific education. Well-trained BA or BS graduates may continue their education at the highest-ranking graduate and professional schools, and/or enter traditional positions in industry (pharmaceutical, biotech) or academia; some might even pursue less traditional positions in areas as diverse as project management, science journalism, and law.

Students may enroll as BA or BS majors in the Chemistry or Chemical Biology programs or may elect to complete a four-year BA-MA program. Upon successful completion of the chemistry major, graduates will be able to use their molecular-level understanding of phenomena to:

  • master a broad set of fundamental chemical knowledge in the basic areas of the curriculum (organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry), with further emphasis on selected areas of specialization (chemical biology, materials chemistry or analytical chemistry).
  • explain experimental observations and data collected from course-related and independent research.
  • interpret literature data and results using fundamental chemical principles.
  • use fundamental chemical principles to explain the qualitative and quantitative bases for common laboratory techniques.
  • select safe and appropriate laboratory techniques and perform the qualitative and quantitative procedures necessary to accomplish research goals.
  • adapt literature information and procedures to achieve specific research goals.
  • evaluate conclusions drawn by scholars in the field of chemistry and recognize current limitations in the field.
  • think critically and creatively about possible approaches to a problem and weigh the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches.
  • collect, interpret, and evaluate disseminated information about scientific problems and current events.
  • articulate scientific ideas and explain data and conclusions to the scholarly, as well as to the lay community.
In addition, graduates participating in research projects will be able to:
  • design and conduct both literature and safe laboratory research aimed at addressing both broad and specific scientific questions.
  • pursue an original chemical research project, formulate a thesis, and present results in both written and oral form.

How to Become a Major

The most important qualification for becoming a chemistry major is interest in and enjoyment of chemistry. In chemistry, as in other sciences, courses build on each other; therefore, it is important to begin early. Most students (but not all) take general chemistry and calculus in their first year. Depending upon the track chosen, the chemistry major requires PHYS 10a,b, 11a,b or PHYS 15a,b (Basic Physics I,II), which is a prerequisite for physical chemistry and advanced experimental chemistry. Completing the PHYS requirement by the end of the sophomore year (strongly recommended) will allow students to take physical chemistry and advanced experimental chemistry during their junior year. During the fall term, interested students meet with chemistry faculty and majors at a "meet the majors" gathering called to discuss the major in chemistry. Students should consult with their faculty advisers to develop a program of courses that addresses their needs and interests. To apply for the honors program, a student must select a research adviser and submit a proposed plan to the department by September 15 of his or her senior year.

How to Be Admitted to the Graduate Program

The general requirements for admission to the Graduate School, given in an earlier section of this Bulletin, apply to candidates for admission to the graduate program in chemistry. In addition, the undergraduate curriculum of applicants should include courses in inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry.

Faculty

Barry Snider, Chair and Undergraduate Advisor for Non-Majors
Development of new synthetic methods. Mechanisms of synthetically important reactions. Total synthesis of natural products.

Li Deng
Asymmetric catalysis and asymmetric synthesis. Solid phase synthesis and combinatorial chemistry. Chiral recognition. Chemical approaches toward understanding protein functions.

Milos Dolnik, Undergraduate Advisor for Minors
Pattern formation in reaction-diffusion systems. Mathematical modeling of complex chemical reactions and gene networks. Deterministic chaos.

Irving Epstein (on leave academic year 2014-2015)
Nonlinear chemical dynamics. Spatial pattern formation, oscillations, and chaos in reaction-diffusion systems. Mathematical modeling of biochemical kinetics and neural networks.

Bruce Foxman, Undergraduate Advisor for Majors
X-ray structure determination. Coordination polymers. Chemical, physical, and crystallographic studies of solid-state reactions. Automatic solution of crystal structures using novel computer techniques.

Liz Hedstrom (on leave academic year 2014-2015)
Relationship between protein structure and function in enzyme catalysis and inhibitor action. Understanding the effects of mutations in vivo.

Judith Herzfeld
Development and application of reactive and polarizable force fields as efficient replacements for quantum mechanics in simulations of reactions in complex media. Solid-state NMR studies of structure and function in membrane proteins and bio-inspired materials.

Isaac Krauss
Study of organic synthesis, including its interface with other areas of chemical science, including organometallics and chemical biology.

Kristen Mascall
Chemical education. Organic Synthesis. Medicinal Chemistry.

Claudia Novack
Chemical education.

Susan Pochapsky
Self-assembly of chemical and biological systems. Transient interactions in solution by NMR. NMR of soluble proteins. Protein stability and folding by NMR and mutagenesis.

Thomas Pochapsky
Biological redox enzymes structure and mechanism. Transient interactions in solution by NMR. Biomimetic energy conversion.

Dagmar Ringe (on leave spring 2015)
Protein crystallography and structural enzymology. Structure and function of PLP dependent enzymes, DNA binding proteins, and enzymes that utilize bimetallic centers for catalysis. Evolution of metabolic pathways. Rational drug design.

Klaus Schmidt-Rohr
Solid-state NMR and structure determination of complex materials, including fuel-cell membranes, semicrystalline polymers, carbon materials, nanocomposites, natural organic matter, and thermoelectrics. NMR technique development. Basic thermodynamics.

Christine Thomas
Synthesis of new ligands and transition metal complexes with the ultimate goal of uncovering new approaches to the catalytic activation and functionalization of small molecules and organic substrates.

Casey Wade
Inorganic, organometallic, and materials synthesis. Design and study of reactive sites in porous coordination polymers for applications in catalysis and aqueous ion separation/remediation.

Bing Xu (on leave fall 2014)
Biofunctional magnetic nanoparticles. Development of new bioanalytical protocols and techniques for studying biological activity. Molecular hydrogels and interactions with biological systems in vitro and in vivo. Development of new biomaterials.

Requirements for the Minor

The minor in chemistry consists of:

A. One year of general chemistry and one year of organic chemistry:

CHEM 11a and 11b (or CHEM 15a and 15b)
CHEM 18a and 18b (or CHEM 19a and 19b)
CHEM 25a and 29a
CHEM 25b and 29b

B. Two additional full-credit (four semester-hour) chemistry courses that meet the major requirements; BCHM 100a, 101a, 103b, or 104b may be substituted for one of these courses.

Requirements for the Major

Bachelor of Arts

A. Two semesters of general chemistry lectures (CHEM 11a,b or CHEM 15a,b) with laboratory (CHEM 18a,b or CHEM 19a,b) and two semesters of organic chemistry lectures (CHEM 25a,b) with laboratory (CHEM 29a,b).

B. Three semester lecture courses, at least two of them in CHEM or CBIO, chosen from courses in CHEM or BCHM numbered 30 or higher (including BIOL 105b and NBIO 148b). Courses must include at least one in each of the following two groups: inorganic chemistry (CHEM 121a, 122b), and physical chemistry (CHEM 141a, 142a).

C. Two laboratory courses chosen from CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a.

D. MATH 10a,b and PHYS 10a,b, 11a,b or 15a,b, which are prerequisites for physical chemistry and advanced experimental chemistry. Students are urged to complete PHYS 10a,b, 11a,b or 15a,b by the end of their sophomore year. Students with AP credit for MATH 10a,b are advised to take at least one additional MATH course at Brandeis, as is generally expected by professional schools. A recently taken math course may also strengthen preparation for physical chemistry. MATH 15a or MATH 20a is suitable for either the medical school requirements or preparation for physical chemistry. PHYS 11a,b or 15a,b is recommended for students planning to attend graduate school in chemistry. For further information students should discuss their proposed program with the undergraduate advising head.

E. Additional requirements for degree with departmental honors: two semesters of CHEM 99d (Senior Research); GPA of 3.00 or higher in all courses taken to meet the major requirements, including laboratories. Students must petition the department by September 15 of their senior year to enter the senior honors program. A thesis describing the research must be submitted and accepted by the department for honors to be awarded.

F. Students planning to pursue graduate study in chemistry should be sure that their program of study includes at least two semesters each of organic chemistry lectures (CHEM 25a,b) and laboratory (CHEM 29a,b), physical chemistry lectures (CHEM 141a, 142a) as well as BCHM 100a. Physics laboratory (PHYS 19a,b) is also advisable.

G. All transfer students must pass satisfactorily a minimum of three chemistry or biochemistry courses at Brandeis at a level of CHEM 25 or higher with one of the three being CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a.

H. A student may graduate with a double major in biology and chemistry if the major requirements in each department are fully met.

I. A student may graduate with a double major in chemistry and biochemistry if the major requirements in each department are fully met.

Bachelor of Science

A. Two semesters of general chemistry lectures (CHEM 11a,b or 15a,b) with laboratory (CHEM18a,b or 19a,b).

B. Two semesters of organic chemistry lectures (CHEM 25a,b) with laboratory (29a,b).

C. Two semesters of physical chemistry lectures (CHEM 141a, 142a).

D. One semester of inorganic chemistry lectures (CHEM 121a, 122b).

E. Three four-credit laboratory courses chosen from CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, 69a, or one arranged with a laboratory instructor.

F. Two additional 100-level CHEM or CBIO courses. (Either CHEM 33a or a 100-level BCHM course may be substituted for one of the two 100-level CHEM courses.)

G. MATH 10a,b and PHYS 11a,b or 15a,b, which are prerequisites for physical chemistry and advanced experimental chemistry. Students are urged to complete PHYS 11a,b or 15a,b by the end of their sophomore year. Students with AP credit for MATH 10a,b are advised to take at least one additional MATH course at Brandeis, as is generally expected by professional schools. A recently taken math course may also strengthen preparation for physical chemistry. MATH 15a or 20a is suitable for either the medical school requirements or preparation for physical chemistry.

Students with strong interests in synthetic or biological chemistry may petition the department undergraduate studies committee to substitute PHYS 10a,b for the PHYS 11a,b/15a,b requirement.  For further information students should discuss their proposed program with the undergraduate advising head.

H. Additional requirements for degree with departmental honors: Two semesters of CHEM 99d (Senior Research) and a GPA of 3.00 or higher in all courses taken to meet the major requirements, including laboratories. Students must petition the department by September 15 of their senior year to enter the senior honors program. A thesis describing the research must be submitted and accepted by the department for honors to be awarded. Students who complete a bachelor of science in chemistry with departmental honors and have taken Chem 39b and 59b usually will have fulfilled the requirements for an American Chemical Society certified degree.

I. For students planning to pursue graduate study in chemistry, BCHM 100a and physics laboratory (PHYS 19a,b) are also advisable.

J. All transfer students must pass satisfactorily a minimum of three chemistry or biochemistry courses at Brandeis at a level of CHEM 25 or higher with one of the three being CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a.

K. Provisions H and I of the BA requirements also apply to BS degrees.

Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science with Specialization in Chemical Biology

Core courses required of all candidates: One year of general chemistry (CHEM 11a,b or CHEM 15a,b) and laboratory (CHEM 18a,b or CHEM 19a,b); one year of calculus (MATH 10a,b; students with AP credit for MATH 10a,b are advised to take at least one additional MATH course at Brandeis); one year of organic chemistry (CHEM 25a,b) and laboratory (CHEM 29a,b); one year of biology (BIOL 14a or 22a or BIOL 15b or 22b) and laboratory (BIOL 18a,b); one year of physics (PHYS 10a,b or PHYS 11a,b or PHYS 15a,b); one semester of introductory biochemistry (BCHM 100a). Students will usually complete the required chemistry, biology and math courses by the end of their sophomore year and take physics as a junior.

Bachelor of Arts

A. Three additional one semester lecture courses in addition to the core courses; one course may be an advanced laboratory course. At least two courses must be in CHEM or CBIO, chosen from courses numbered 39 or higher. One course may be chosen from any 100-level or higher course in BIOL, BCHM or NBIO.

B. Additional requirements for degree with departmental honors: two semesters of CHEM 99d (Senior Research); GPA of 3.00 or higher in all courses taken to meet the major requirements, including laboratories. Students must petition the department by September 15 of their senior year to enter the senior honors program. A thesis describing the research must be submitted and accepted by the department for honors to be awarded.

C. All transfer students must pass satisfactorily a minimum of three chemistry or biochemistry courses at Brandeis at a level of CHEM 25 or higher.

D. Students planning to pursue graduate study in chemistry should be sure that their program of study includes two semesters of physical chemistry lectures (CHEM 141a and 142a).

E. Students planning to enter medical or dental school should be sure that their program of study includes two semesters physics laboratory (PHYS 18a,b or PHYS 19a,b).

Bachelor of Science

A. Five additional one semester lecture courses and two laboratory courses in addition to the core courses.

B. One of the lecture courses must be Chem 141a.

C. One of the lecture courses must be in molecular biology, chosen from BIOL 101a or BIOL 105b.

D. At least two of the three additional lecture courses must be chosen from 100-level courses in CHEM or CBIO. A laboratory course (CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a) not used to fulfill requirement E may be substituted for one of the lecture courses. The third additional lecture course may be chosen from any 100-level or higher course in CHEM, CBIO, BIOL, BCHM or NBIO.

E. At least one laboratory course must be chosen from CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a. The other laboratory course may be a Life Sciences project laboratory chosen from BIOL 155a, BIOL 156a, BIOL 159a, or BCHM 155b.

F. Additional requirements for degree with departmental honors: two semesters of CHEM 99d (Senior Research); GPA of 3.00 or higher in all courses taken to meet the major requirements, including laboratories. Students must petition the department by September 15 of their senior year to enter the senior honors program. A thesis describing the research must be submitted and accepted by the department for honors to be awarded.

G. All transfer students must pass satisfactorily a minimum of three chemistry or biochemistry courses at Brandeis at a level of CHEM 25 or higher.

H. Students planning to pursue graduate study in chemistry should be sure that their program of study includes two semesters of physical chemistry lectures (i.e., CHEM 142a in addition to 141a).

I. Students planning to enter medical or dental school should be sure that their program of study includes two semesters physics laboratory (PHYS 18a,b or PHYS 19a,b).

Combined BA/MA Program

Candidates for departmental honors may be admitted to a special four-year BA/MA program upon recommendation of the department and the Graduate School. Application must be made by May 1 preceding the senior year. Students must complete requirements A-D as described in the requirements for the BA.

Additionally, the following requirements must also be completed:

A. Two semesters of CHEM 99d (Senior Research); GPA of 3.00 or higher in all courses taken to meet the major requirements, including laboratories. A thesis describing the research must be submitted and accepted by the department.

B. One 130-level organic chemistry course.

C. One 140-level physical chemistry course. The overall BA/MA course selection must include CHEM 141a and 142a.

D. One 100-level chemistry course OR one of CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a.

E. Two other 100-level courses from the School of Science.

F.  Candidates for the BA/MA degree should take Physics 11a,b or 15a,b. However, students with strong interests in synthetic or biological chemistry may petition the department undergraduate studies committee to substitute PHYS 10a,b for the PHYS 11a,b/15a,b requirement. For further information students should discuss their proposed program with the undergraduate advising head.

The five courses in sections B-E may not also be counted toward the BA requirements. Grades of B- or higher are required in the 100-level science courses. Candidates should carefully read the section “Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs” under the heading “Special Academic Opportunities,” which appears earlier in this Bulletin. Most notable are the three-year residence requirement and the required total of thirty-eight courses, only four of which may come from AP/IB credits, consistent with university regulations.

Combined BA with Specialization in Chemical Biology/MA Program

Candidates for departmental honors may be admitted to a special four-year BA with specialization in chemical biology/MA program upon recommendation of the department and the Graduate School. Application must be made by May 1 preceding the senior year.

A. Seven additional one semester lecture courses and two laboratory courses in addition to the core courses required of all candidates required of all candidates for degrees with specialization in chemical biology.

B. One course must be Chem 141a.

C. One course must be in molecular biology, chosen from BIOL 101a or BIOL 105b.

D. At least four additional lecture courses in CHEM or CBIO, chosen from courses numbered 100 or higher. One elective may be chosen from any 100-level or higher course in BIOL, BCHM or NBIO.

E. At least one laboratory course must be chosen from CHEM 39b, 49a, 59b, or 69a. The other laboratory course may be a Life Sciences project laboratory chosen from BIOL 155a, BIOL 156a or BCHM 155b.

F. Two semesters of CHEM 99d (Senior Research); GPA of 3.00 or higher in all courses taken to meet the major requirements, including laboratories. A thesis describing the research must be submitted and accepted by the department.

G. All transfer students must pass satisfactorily a minimum of three chemistry or biochemistry courses at Brandeis at a level of CHEM 25 or higher.

H. Students planning to pursue graduate study in chemistry should be sure that their program of study includes two semesters of physical chemistry lectures (i.e., CHEM 142a in addition to 141a).

I. Students planning to enter medical or dental school should be sure that their program of study includes two semesters physics laboratory (PHYS 18a,b or PHYS 19a,b).

Grades of B- or higher are required in the 100-level science courses. Candidates should carefully read the section “Dual Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree Programs” under the heading “Special Academic Opportunities,” which appears earlier in this Bulletin. Most notable are the three-year residence requirement and the required total of thirty-eight courses, only four of which may come from AP/IB credits, consistent with university regulations.

Special Notes Relating to Undergraduates

For Majors and Minors in Chemistry: No course offered for major or minor requirements may be taken pass/fail. A course used to satisfy the requirements for the major or minor must be passed with a grade of C- or higher.

For Prospective Medical School Applicants: Either CHEM 11a,b lecture and CHEM 18a,b laboratory or CHEM 15a,b lecture and CHEM 19a,b laboratory will satisfy the general chemistry requirements of most medical schools. The organic chemistry requirements of most medical schools will be satisfied by CHEM 25a,b lecture and CHEM 29a,b laboratory.

Lecture Course Corequisites for Laboratory Courses: Laboratory courses Chem 18a, 18b, 19a, 19b, 29a and 29b have a lecture course corequisite. If the corequisite is not taken concurrently, it must have been completed with a satisfactory grade (C- or better).

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Arts

Program of Study
Each candidate is required to successfully complete one year of study at the graduate level in chemistry, or, with prior permission of the graduate studies committee, in related fields. The program will include six term courses at the graduate level, two semesters of colloquium, and one semester of a specialty seminar. The detailed program of study will be chosen jointly by the candidate and the graduate studies committee.

Library Training Requirement
All graduate students are required to complete a designated library training program in their first year.

Placement and Evaluation of Progress
Each student is expected to demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge of undergraduate chemistry in placement examinations in physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry. These examinations occur twice a year, before the start of each term. The results of these examinations will determine the student's initial program of course work and will be considered by the graduate studies committee in evaluating the student's progress.

Residence Requirement
The minimum residence requirement for the MA degree is one year.

Requirements for the Degree of Master of Science

Program of Study
In general, each student will be required to pass a minimum of six graduate-level courses, of which one must be outside the student's field of research. In addition, all students are required to participate regularly in both colloquium and seminar, and take CONT 300b (Responsible Conduct of Science) normally during their first year.

If a student fails to pass a placement examination after two attempts, a graduate course in that area of chemistry must be passed before the end of the second year. A list of courses appropriate for this purpose is available upon request.

It is expected that students will choose a research adviser during the first year.

Library Training Requirement
All graduate students are required to complete a designated library training program in their first year.

Placement and Evaluation of Progress
Each student is expected to demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge of undergraduate chemistry in placement examinations in physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry. These examinations occur twice a year, before the start of each term. The results of these examinations will determine the student's initial program of course work and will be considered by the graduate studies committee in evaluating the student's progress.

Residence Requirement
The minimum residence requirement for the MS degree is two years.

Colloquium and Seminar
Each student in residence is required to attend and participate in the departmental colloquium every semester and the seminar in their chosen specialty every semester in which it is offered. Each student is expected to present one seminar during their residence.

Master's Thesis
A thesis is required that describes the results of an original investigation and demonstrates the competence of the candidate in independent investigation, critical ability, and effectiveness of expression. The thesis must be approved by the research adviser and a second reader appointed by the graduate studies committee. The master’s thesis must be deposited electronically to the Robert D. Farber University Archives at Brandeis.

Special Notes Relating to Master's Degrees

For students in the Ph. D. program, the MA degree is awarded as a first step toward the PhD. The MS degree is designed for advanced students who do not wish to complete the PhD degree.

Students may normally hold only one master's degree in the department. For example, a student who has received an MA degree may not apply for the MS degree.

Students in the MA or MS program are not eligible for fellowship support and may receive only limited scholarship aid. Applicants to the master's program will initially be admitted only to the MA program, with transfer into the second year of the MS program contingent on their first year performance.

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy

Program of Study
A balanced program of study will be prepared by the student and the graduate studies committee. In general, students will be required to take a minimum of six graduate-level courses, of which one must be outside the student's field of research. In addition, all students are required to participate regularly in both colloquium and seminar, and take CONT 300b (Responsible Conduct of Science) normally during their first year.

If a student fails to pass a placement examination, a graduate course in that area of chemistry must be passed before the end of the second year. A list of courses appropriate for this purpose is available upon request. For students entering with a master's degree or the equivalent, credit for two to four courses may be transferred if program guidelines are met.

It is expected that students will choose a research adviser during the first year.

Placement and Evaluation of Progress
Each student is expected to demonstrate a satisfactory knowledge of undergraduate chemistry in placement examinations in physical, organic, and inorganic chemistry. These examinations are set twice a year, before the start of each term. The results of these examinations will determine the student's initial program of course work and will be considered by the graduate studies committee in evaluating the student's progress.

Readmission to the PhD degree program will be based on the student's record in course work during the first year and his or her performance on the placement examinations. Further progress will be evaluated on a yearly basis by the graduate studies committee.

Qualifying Examinations
The graduate student must demonstrate proficiency in his or her major field by passing the qualifying exam in that specialty. The form of the qualifying exam depends on the specialty. In organic chemistry, cumulative examinations (given six times each year on unannounced topics) are taken starting in the first semester of graduate work. Proficiency is demonstrated by passing six exams within a reasonable period of time. In other specialties, students prepare materials that are defended orally. This exam is generally completed during the third semester of graduate work. Students in all fields must maintain satisfactory progress by passing these examinations.

Residence Requirement
The minimum residence requirement for the PhD degree is three years.

Colloquium and Seminar
Each student in residence is required to attend and participate in the departmental colloquium every semester and the seminar in their chosen specialty every semester in which it is offered. Each student is expected to present two seminars during their residence.

Teaching Requirement
It is required that all graduate students participate in undergraduate teaching during the course of their studies.

Library Training Requirement
All graduate students are required to complete a designated library training program in their first year.

Dissertation and Defense
A dissertation is required that describes the results of an original investigation and demonstrates the competence of the candidate in independent investigation, critical ability, and effectiveness of expression. The student must successfully defend the dissertation in a final oral examination.

Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Chemistry with Specialization in Quantitative Biology

Program of Study
Students wishing to obtain the specialization must first gain approval of the graduate studies committee. This should be done as early as possible; ideally, during the first year of graduate studies. In order to receive the PhD in chemistry with additional specialization in quantitative biology, candidates must:

A. Complete the requirements for the PhD described above.

B. Complete the course requirements of the quantitative biology specialization as outlined in that section of this Bulletin.

Any alteration to the quantitative biology course requirements must be approved by the graduate studies committee and by the quantitative biology program faculty advisory committee.

Courses of Instruction

(1-99) Primarily for Undergraduate Students

CHEM 11a General Chemistry I
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This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15a in previous years. Four class hours and one sixty-minute structured study group session per week. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18a.
Covers a wide array of topics, embracing aspects of descriptive, as well as quantitative, chemistry. No prior study of chemistry is assumed, as the course begins by looking at the atomic foundation of matter, the elements, and the organization of the periodic table, working its way up to studying how atoms are bonded together to form larger units of matter. Students who complete this course will have an understanding of the three major phases of matter—solids, liquids, and gases—and how they behave, as well as a knowledge of the major types of chemical reactions and how to represent them. A strong focus is put on learning methods of creative problem-solving—using the material as a way to develop creative approaches to solving unfamiliar problems—a skill that carries students far beyond the confines of the classroom. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Novack

CHEM 11b General Chemistry II
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11a or an approved equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 15b in previous years. Four class hours and one sixty-minute structured study group session per week. The corresponding lab is CHEM 18b.
Picks up where Chemistry 11a left off, advancing students’ understanding of bonding models and molecular structure and exploring the basics of coordination chemistry. Three major quantitative topics are covered in the second half of General Chemistry—chemical equilibrium (including acid-base chemistry, solubility, and complex-ion formation), chemical kinetics, and thermodynamics. Other topics explored are electrochemistry and nuclear chemistry. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Novack

CHEM 15a Honors General Chemistry I
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This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 11a in previous years. Three class hours and one recitation per week. The corresponding laboratory is CHEM 19a.
An advanced version of general chemistry for students with good preparation in math and chemistry in high school. Topics include chemical stoichiometry, chemical bonding from a classical and quantum mechanical perspective, gases, thermochemistry, solutions, states of matter atomic structure and periodic properties. Real world examples are used to demonstrate the concepts. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Wade

CHEM 15b Honors General Chemistry II
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 15a or the equivalent. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 11b in previous years. Three class hours and one recitation per week. The corresponding laboratory is CHEM 19b.
A continuation of CHEM 15a. Topics include an introduction to thermodynamics, chemical equilibria, including acid-base and solubility equilibria, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry, coordination chemistry and special topics. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Mascall

CHEM 18a General Chemistry Laboratory I
Corequisite: CHEM 11a. Dropping CHEM 11a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. Two semester-hour credits; yields half-course credit. Laboratory fee: $100 per semester. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 19a in previous years.
Introduction to basic laboratory methods and methods of qualitative and quantitative analyses. Included in the analytical methods are gas chromatography and infrared measurements. A synthesis project that includes analyzing the product by titration. Calorimetric experiment using probes interfaced with computers. Identification of unknowns based on physical and chemical properties. Analysis of the metal content of substances by atomic absorption. One laboratory lecture per week. One afternoon of laboratory per week. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Dolnik

CHEM 18b General Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18a and CHEM 11a. Corequisite: CHEM 11b. Dropping CHEM 11b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $100 per semester. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have passed CHEM 19b in previous years.
The second semester of the general chemistry laboratory program. Continued use of probes interfaced with computers to monitor pH and electrical conductivity changes in titrating weak monoprotic and polyprotic amino acids, to monitor pressure changes as part of a kinetics study, and to monitor voltage changes of electrochemical cells with temperature so as to establish thermodynamic parameters for redox reactions. Also included is identification of unknowns based on selective precipitation. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Dolnik

CHEM 19a Honors General Chemistry Laboratory I
Corequisite: CHEM 15a. Dropping CHEM 15a necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $100 per semester. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken CHEM 18a in previous years.
An advanced version of CHEM 18a. One afternoon of laboratory per week. One laboratory lecture per week. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Dolnik

CHEM 19b Honors General Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 19a. Corequisite: CHEM 15b. Dropping CHEM 15b necessitates written permission from the lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $100 per semester. This course may not be taken for credit by students who have taken CHEM 18b in previous years.
Continuation of CHEM 19a. An advanced version of CHEM 18b. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Dolnik

CHEM 25a Organic Chemistry, Lectures
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 11b or 15b or the equivalent. CHEM 25a honors option involves a separate recitation and permission of the instructor to enroll. Students in the honors section will receive a note on their transcript designating the class "Honors Organic Chemistry." Three class hours and one ninety-minute recitation per week.
Structure, reactions, preparations, and uses of the compounds of carbon. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Mascall

CHEM 25b Organic Chemistry, Lectures
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 25a or its equivalent. CHEM 25b honors option involves a separate recitation and permission of the instructor to enroll. Students in the honors section will receive a note on their transcript designating the class "Honors Organic Chemistry." Three class hours and one ninety-minute recitation per week.
A continuation of CHEM 25a. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Krauss

CHEM 29a Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18b or 19b or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25a. Dropping CHEM 25a necessitates written permission from lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $125 per semester.
Gives experience in the important techniques of organic chemical laboratory practice of isolation and purification of organic compounds by crystallization, distillation, and chromatography, and their characterization using analytical and instrumental methods. One afternoon of laboratory per week. One ninety-minute laboratory lecture per week. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Mascall

CHEM 29b Organic Chemistry Laboratory II
Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 29a or the equivalent. Corequisite: CHEM 25b. Dropping CHEM 25b necessitates written permission from lab instructor to continue with this course. May yield half-course credit toward rate of work and graduation. Two semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $125 per semester.
A continuation of CHEM 29a with an emphasis on the synthesis of typical organic compounds. One afternoon of laboratory per week. One ninety-minute laboratory lecture per week. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Mascall

CHEM 33a Environmental Chemistry
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade (C- or higher) in CHEM 11b or 15b or the equivalent.
The course surveys the important chemical principles and reactions that determine the balance of the molecular species in the environment and how human activity affects this balance. The class evaluates current issues of environmental concern such as ozone depletion, global warming, sustainable energy, toxic chemicals, water pollution, and green chemistry. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Peavey

CHEM 39b Intermediate Chemistry Laboratory
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Prerequisites: Satisfactory grades (C- or better) in CHEM 121a or 122b, or permission of the instructor. Four semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $125 per semester.
While the emphasis of this course is on synthetic inorganic chemistry, the content is interdisciplinary in nature, covering topics and techniques in the areas of analytical and organic chemistry as well as inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Compounds are synthesized and characterized by a wide range of instrumental methods of analysis (including GC-MS, IR, and NMR spectroscopies, magnetic measurements, and electrochemical methods). To better mimic a research laboratory, experiments are comprised of 3 research projects, lasting 3-5 weeks each, followed by a lab report in the style of a peer-reviewed journal article. The lectures cover the appropriate scientific and historical background for each project and the use of experimental techniques. One afternoon of lab per week and one one-hour lecture per week. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Thomas

CHEM 49a Advanced Experimental Organic Chemistry
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Prerequisites: C- or higher in CHEM 25a and b, and CHEM 29a and b, or the equivalent. Four semester-hour credits. Laboratory fee: $125 per semester.
Compounds will be synthesized, purified and then characterized by NMR, IR and mass spectroscopy. Multi-week projects will be completed with a lab report in the style of a journal article with full experimental supporting information. The lectures cover the necessary background and experimental techniques for each project. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Snider

CHEM 59b Advanced Experimental Chemistry I
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This is an experiential learning course. Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or higher in CHEM 18b or equivalent; CHEM 141a or 142a (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent. One one-hour lecture and one afternoon of lab per week. Laboratory fee: $125 per semester.
This course introduces the student to a number of topics of current interest in physical and analytical chemistry and provides experimental verification of physico-chemical principles in thermodynamics, kinetics, macromolecules, organic chemistry, semiconductors, nanochemistry, photochemistry, magnetic resonance imaging and electrochemistry. The properties, reactions, and structure of compounds are understood by evaluating their physiochemical responses to changes in experimental conditions. The experiments use synthesis, spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemical and other instrumental methods employed in the modern chemical laboratory. The program includes the methodology of quantitative measurement, statistical data analysis, and report writing. One one-hour lecture and one afternoon of laboratory per week. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Pochapsky

CHEM 69a Advanced Experimental Chemistry II
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Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in CHEM 18b or equivalent; CHEM 141a or 142a (may be taken concurrently) or equivalent. Laboratory fee: $125 per semester.
Introduces the student to selected topics in materials chemistry and provides hands-on experience for making materials that find applications in the real world or are being intensively explored for a wide range of applications. By focusing on the design, control, and characterization of the atomic and molecular structures, macroscopic properties, and applications of materials, we will introduce materials chemistry as a frontier of science that aims to address important societal problems, such as energy and health. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Xu

CHEM 95a Directed Studies in Chemistry
Prerequisites: CHEM 25a and 29a, or equivalent. Does not meet the major requirements in chemistry. May not be repeated for credit. A designated library training component must be completed as soon as it is offered.
Readings and/or independent laboratory work. Periodic conferences with advisor and a final written report. CHEM 95a and 95b may be taken individually as one-semester courses or together as a year-long sequence. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 95b Directed Studies in Chemistry
See CHEM 95a for course description. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 99d Senior Research
Prerequisites: Permission of instructor; open only to senior honors candidates. Does not meet the major requirements in chemistry. A designated library training component must be completed as soon as it is offered. At the end of the first semester, the introduction to the research thesis with extensive bibliography is due.
A year-long course focused on a research project with a member of the department. Successful completion of the course involves writing a detailed report on the project. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHSC 3b Solving Environmental Challenges: The Role of Chemistry
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Does not meet the requirements for the major in chemistry.
Provides a basic understanding of the chemistry of natural environmental cycles, and how these cycles are adversely affected by society. Student teams develop case studies on "hot topics" such as mercury, brominated flame retardants, MBTE, perchlorate, dioxin, and others. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Peavey

CHSC 4b Understanding the Chemistry of Sustainability
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Prerequisites: High school-level chemistry or environmental science/studies is required. Students missing this background may petition the instructor for permission to enroll. Does NOT meet requirements for the major in chemistry.
An exploration of the role of green chemistry, nanotechnology, bioengineering, innovative design, and greater reliance on renewable resources in achieving environmental sustainability. Topics include sustainable energy, recognized green sector industries, green chemicals, environmentally preferable products, and sustainable manufacturing. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Peavey

CHSC 8b Chemistry and Art
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Does NOT meet requirements for the major in chemistry but does meet requirements for the major in Classical Studies.
Topics include a scientific description of the materials and methods used in making works of art; light and color; pigments and dyes; restoration and conservation; scientific examination of material culture; the identification of fakes; and scientific probes of influence and style. Usually offered every fourth year.
Mr. Koh

(100-199) For Both Undergraduate and Graduate Students

CBIO 101a Chemical Biology
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Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade (C- or better) in BIOL 14a or BIOL 22a, BIOL 15b or BIOL 22b, and CHEM 25a and b, or the equivalent.
Explores how scientific work in chemistry led to fundamental understanding of and ability to manipulate biological processes. Emphasis is placed on chemical design and synthesis as well as biological evaluation and utility. Content based on scientific literature readings. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Pochapsky

CBIO 106b Chemical Biology: Medicinal Enzymology
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Prerequisites: Satisfactory grade in BIOL 14a or BIOL 22a, BIOL 15b or BIOL 22b, CHEM 25a and 25b, and BCHM 100a or the equivalent.
Introduces students to the conceptual framework and experimental methods in medicinal chemistry. Topics include mechanisms of drug-target interactions, strategies for lead optimization and issues in metabolism, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. Readings drawn from textbooks and the original scientific literature. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. Hedstrom

CHEM 121a Inorganic Chemistry I, Lectures
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 25a and b.
Simple bonding theory. Symmetry, structure, and bonding in inorganic compounds. Solid-state chemistry; ionic and electronic conductors. Applications of group theory and bonding theory to main group compounds and transition metal complexes. Coordination chemistry: isomerism, structure, and reactions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Foxman

CHEM 122b Inorganic Chemistry II, Lectures
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 25a and b, or permission of instructor.
Symmetry, structure and bonding in inorganic compounds. Molecular orbital theory. Acid-base concepts. Introduction to the synthesis, structure, characterization and applications of transition metal compounds. Organometallic chemistry. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Wade

CHEM 129b Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry: Introduction to X-ray Structure Determination
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 121a or 122b, or permission of instructor. Knowledge of point groups is essential, but such knowledge may be gained through reading and exercises provided by the instructor.
Topics include basic diffraction and space group theory, practical manipulations of crystals and X-ray diffraction equipment, solving crystal structures, and interpretation of structural chemistry. Course features self-paced exercises on PCs. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Foxman

CHEM 130a Advanced Organic Chemistry: Structure
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 25a and b, or the equivalent.
Chemical bonding and structure, stereochemical principles and conformational analysis, organic reaction mechanisms, structures and activities of reactive intermediates, and pericyclic reactions. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Deng

CHEM 132b Advanced Organic Chemistry: Spectroscopy
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 25a and b, or the equivalent.
Application of spectroscopy to the elucidation of structure and stereochemistry of organic compounds, with emphasis on modern NMR and MS methods. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Snider

CHEM 134b Advanced Organic Chemistry: Synthesis
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 25a and b, or the equivalent.
Modern synthetic methods are covered, with an emphasis on mechanism and stereochemical control. Discusses the formation of carbon-carbon single and double bonds and carbocycles and procedures for oxidation, reduction, and functional group interchange. Examines selected total syntheses. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Deng

CHEM 135a Advanced Organic Chemistry: Modern Catalytic Reactions in Organic Synthesis
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Prerequisite: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 25a and b, or the equivalent.
Examines the application of modern catalytic and asymmetric methods in organic synthesis is illustrated. Hydrogenation, hydride addition, epoxidation, dihydroxylation, olefin metathesis, C-H activation, and C-C bond forming reactions are discussed, together with recent applications of these reactions to natural product synthesis. Catalysis by metal complexes and organic molecules is discussed with emphasis on the interplay between mechanistic insight and catalyst design. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Krauss

CHEM 141a Classical and Statistical Thermodynamics
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Prerequisites: Satisfactory grade in CHEM 11a, 15a and CHEM 11b, 15b or the equivalent; MATH 10a,b or the equivalent; PHYS 10a,b, 11a,b or 15a,b or the equivalent. Organic chemistry is also recommended.
Thermodynamic principles, tools, and applications in chemistry and biology. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Herzfeld

CHEM 142a Quantum Mechanics and Spectroscopy
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Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 11a,b or 15a,b or the equivalent; MATH 10a,b or the equivalent; PHYS 10a,b, 11a,b, or 15a,b or the equivalent. Organic chemistry is also recommended.
Solutions to the Schrodinger equation of relevance to molecular structure, reactivity and spectroscopy; introduction to quantum mechanical calculations and computational methods. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Schmidt-Rohr

CHEM 146b Advanced NMR Spectroscopy
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Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade in PHYS 10a,b, 11a,b, or 15a,b or the equivalent; MATH 10a,10b. Formerly offered as CHEM 246b.
A detailed discussion of modern NMR methods will be presented. The course is designed so as to be accessible to nonspecialists, but still provide a strong background in the theory and practice of modern NMR techniques. Topics include the theory of pulse and multidimensional NMR experiments, chemical shift, scalar and dipolar coupling, NOE, spin-operator formalism, heteronuclear and inverse-detection methods, Hartmann-Hahn and spin-locking experiments. Experimental considerations such as pulse sequence design, phase cycling, and gradient methods will be discussed. Guest lecturers will provide insight into particular topics such as solid-state NMR and NMR instrumental design. Usually offered every third year.
Mr. Pochapsky

CHEM 160a Materials Chemistry: Molecular Foundation for Nanobiotechnology
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Prerequisites: A satisfactory grade in CHEM 11B, 15B or the equivalent or permission of instructor.
Focuses on the elucidation and design of nanomaterials at the molecular scale, with emphasis on nanomaterials to be used in biotechnology and biomedicine. It aims to provide students with multidisciplinary knowledge at the intersection of physical, biological, and materials science. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Xu

(200 and above) Primarily for Graduate Students

CHEM 200a Advanced Chemistry Laboratory I
Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 200b Advanced Chemistry Laboratory II
Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 220b Inorganic Chemistry Seminar
Yields half-course credit. Formerly offered as CHEM 220c.
Required of graduate students in inorganic chemistry whenever offered. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 230b Organic Chemistry Seminar
Yields half-course credit. Formerly offered as CHEM 230c.
Required of graduate students in organic chemistry whenever offered. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 240b Physical Chemistry Seminar
Yields half-course credit. Formerly offered as CHEM 240c.
Required of graduate students in physical chemistry whenever offered. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 250b Biophysical Chemistry Seminar
Yields half-course credit. Formerly offered as CHEM 250c.
Required of graduate students in biophysical chemistry whenever offered. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 260b Materials Chemistry Seminar
Yields half-course credit. Formerly offered as CHEM 260c.
Required of graduate students in materials chemistry whenever offered. Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 298a Independent Study
Usually offered every year.
Staff

CHEM 300c Chemistry Colloquium
Yields half-course credit per semester.
Required of graduate students in Chemistry. Usually offered every semester.
Staff

CHEM 401d Dissertation Research
Independent research for the PhD degree. Specific sections for individual faculty members as requested.
Staff

Courses of Related Interest

BCHM 100a Introductory Biochemistry
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Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry with laboratory.
Topics include chemistry, reaction, and metabolism of biologically important compounds; formation and utilization of "energy-rich" compounds; introduction to enzyme mechanisms; interrelation and comparison of basic biochemical and chemical processes; and metabolic regulation. Usually offered every year in multiple sections.
Ms. Westover

BCHM 101a Advanced Biochemistry: Enzyme Mechanisms
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Prerequisites: One year of organic chemistry with laboratory and BCHM 100a or equivalents.
Describes the principles of biological catalysts and the chemical logic of metabolic pathways. Discusses representative enzymes from each reaction class, with an emphasis on understanding how mechanisms are derived from experimental evidence. Topics include serine proteases, phosphatases, isomerases, carboxylases, and dehydrogenases. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Oprian

BCHM 102a Quantitative Approaches to Biochemical Systems
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Prerequisite: BCHM 100a or equivalent.
Introduces quantitative approaches to analyzing macromolecular structure and function. Emphasizes the use of basic thermodynamics and single-molecule and ensemble kinetics to elucidate biochemical reaction mechanisms. Also discusses the physical bases of spectroscopic and diffraction methods commonly used in the study of proteins and nucleic acids. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BCHM 103b Advanced Biochemistry: Cellular Information Transfer Mechanisms
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Prerequisites: One year of organic chemistry with laboratory and BCHM 100a or equivalents.
Addresses fundamental issues of information transfer in biological systems at a molecular level. Topics may include: DNA recombination and replication; transcription (DNA to RNA); processing/maturation of precursor RNA transcripts; and translation (RNA to protein). An emphasis will be placed on through review of the scientific literature, our understanding of the basics of these events in different biological systems, as well as how they are regulated. Usually offered every year.
Staff

BCHM 104b Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules II
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Prerequisites: BCHM 100a, and one of the following: BCHM 104a, CHEM 141a, or Phys 40a.
Illustrates the basic principles on which biological macromolecules are constructed and by which they function. Describes overall structures of proteins, nucleic acids, and membranes in terms of the underlying molecular forces: electrostatics, hydrophobic interactions, and H-bonding. The energetics of macromolecular folding and of the linkage between ligand binding and conformational changes will also be discussed. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Theobald

BCHM 155b Biochemistry Laboratory
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Prerequisite: BCHM 100a must be taken before or concurrently with this course. Required course for the MS in Biotechnology. Course fee: $150.
Time-intensive laboratory class provides hands-on experience in biochemical techniques, with a focus on proteins. Students engage in skill-building and inquiry-based experiments. Students present research findings in written and oral formats. Usually offered every year.
Ms. Westover

COSI 177a Scientific Data Processing in Matlab
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Prerequisite: COSI 11a. MATH 15a is recommended.
Introduces scientific computing using Matlab. Programming concepts such as data types, vectors, conditional execution, loops, procedural abstraction, modules, APIs are presented. The course will present scientific techniques relevant to computational science, with an emphasis on image processing. Usually offered every second year.
Ms. DiLillo

COSI 178a Computational Molecular Biology
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Open to advanced undergraduate students and graduate students.
Information and computing technologies are becoming indispensable to modern biological research due to significant advances of high-throughput experimental technologies in recent years. This course presents an overview of the systemic development and application of computing systems and computational algorithms/techniques to the analysis of biological data, such as sequences, gene expression, protein expression, and biological networks. Hands-on training will be provided. Usually offered every other year.
Mr. Hong

NBIO 136b Computational Neuroscience
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Prerequisite: NBIO 140b or PHYS 10a or approved equivalents.
An introduction to concepts and methods in computer modeling of neural systems. Topics include single and multicompartmental models of neurons, information representation and processing by populations of neurons, synaptic plasticity and models of learning, working memory, decision making and neuroeconomics. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Miller

QBIO 110a Numerical Modeling of Biological Systems
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Prerequisite: MATH 10a and b or equivalent.
Modern scientific computation applied to problems in molecular and cell biology. Covers techniques such as numerical integration of differential equations, molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. Applications range from enzymes and molecular motors to cells. Usually offered every second year.
Mr. Hagan

QBIO 120b Quantitative Biology Instrumentation Laboratory
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Focuses on optical and other instruments commonly used in biomedical laboratories to make quantitative measurements in vivo and in vitro. Students disassemble and reconfigure modular instruments in laboratory exercises that critically evaluate instrument reliability and usability and investigate the origins of noise and systematic error in measurements. Usually offered every year.
Mr. Dogic