Events

MAT Teacher Research Presentations

July 2, 2021

The Master of Arts in Teaching Program will be holding the 2021 MAT Teacher Research Presentations on Friday, July 2, 2021, 1pm - 5pm. The event will be held in Hassenfeld Conference Center at Brandeis University. More details to follow.   
student shaking hands with an advisor

Info sessions are held every October, November and February.  

Learn about the MAT Program! Meet faculty members, administrators and current students. Ask about our programs, admissions, student life, career planning and financial aid. This event will be held via Zoom video conferencing. 

 

Interested in teaching? Talk to an advisor and learn about the MAT

Connect with us via Zoom, email or over the phone. Our program advisors are ready to answer your questions about timelines, admission requirements, internships, schedules and scholarship opportunities.

To schedule an appointment, call 781-736-2022 or email mat@brandeis.edu.

Picture of Stefan Bradley

Monday, April 12, 4:30 pm

Speaker: Stefan Bradley, Coordinator for Diversity and Inclusion Initiatives in the Bellarmine College of Liberal Arts and Professor of African American Studies at Loyola Marymount University

Dr. Bradley received his PhD in 20th Century US History with an emphasis on the Black Experience from the University of Missouri-Columbia; an MA in the same from Washington State University; and a BA in History from Gonzaga University.  

Some of his publications include his newest book, Upending the Ivory Tower:  Civil Rights, Black Power, and the Ivy League, which won the History of Education Society Outstanding Book Award as well as the Anna Julia Cooper & CLR James Book Award from the National Council of Black Studies; Harlem vs. Columbia University:  Black Student Power in the Late 1960s, which won the Phillis Wheatley Book Prize; and, Alpha Phi Alpha:  A Legacy of Greatness, The Demands of Transcendence

This talk is co-sponsored by the Education Program; the History Department; the Marya Levenson Fund for Education, Equity, and Racial Justice; the Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy; the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; and the School of Arts and Sciences Co-curricular Fund.

Picture of Crystal Sanders

Monday, March 15, 4pm

Speaker: Crystal Sanders, P.h.D., Associate Professor at Pennsylvania State University

Dr. Sanders is an award-winning historian of the United States in the twentieth century.  Her research and teaching interests include African American History, Black Women's History, and the History of Black Education.  She received her BA (cum laude) in History and Public Policy from Duke University and a PhD in History from Northwestern University. She is an Associate Professor of History and the former Director of the Africana Research Center at Pennsylvania State University. During the 2020-2021 academic year, she is a fellow at the National Humanities Center. 

Dr. Sanders is the author of A Chance for Change: Head Start and Mississippi's Black Freedom Struggle published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2016 as part of the John Hope Franklin Series in African American History and Culture.  The book won the 2017 Critics Choice Award from the American Educational Research Association and the 2017 New Scholar’s Book Award from Division F of the American Educational Research Association. The book was also a finalist for the 2016 Hooks National Book Award. Sanders’ work can also be found in many of the leading history journals including the Journal of Southern History, the North Carolina Historical Review, and the Journal of African American History.

This talk is co-sponsored by the Education Program; the History Department; the Marya Levenson Fund for Education, Equity, and Racial Justice; the Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy; the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; and the School of Arts and Sciences Co-curricular Fund.

picture of Travis Bristol

Monday, March 1, 4pm

Speaker: Travis Bristol, Ph.D., Assistant Professor at University of California, Berkeley

Watch Video

Travis J. Bristol is an assistant professor at the University of California, Berkeley’s Graduate School of Education. Before joining Berkeley's faculty, he was a Peter Paul Assistant Professor at Boston University. Dr. Bristol's research is situated at the intersection of educational policy and teacher education. Using qualitative methods, he explores three related research strands: (1) the role of educational policies in shaping teacher workplace experiences and retention; (2) district and school-based professional learning communities; (3) the role of race and gender in educational settings. Dr. Bristol's research has appeared in peer-reviewed journals including Urban Education, the American Educational Research Journal, the Journal of Teacher Education, Teachers College Record, and Harvard Educational Review. He is currently co-editing (with Conra Gist) The Handbook of Research on Teachers of Color, which will be published by the American Educational Research Association (AERA).  The National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, Ford Foundation, and AERA awarded Dr. Bristol dissertation fellowships in 2013. In 2016, he received the inaugural teacher diversity research award from the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. In 2019, Dr. Bristol received a Ford Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship and an emerging scholar award from the Comparative and International Education Society, African Diaspora SIG. In 2020, he received a National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship. Dr. Bristol is on the Board of Directors of Teach Plus; the National Center for Teacher Residencies; and the East Bay School for Boys. He is a former student and teacher in New York City public schools and teacher educator with the Boston Teacher Residency program. Dr. Bristol received his A.B. from Amherst College; an M.A. from Stanford University; and a Ph.D. from Teachers College, Columbia University.

This talk is co-sponsored by the Education Program; the History Department; the Marya Levenson Fund for Education, Equity, and Racial Justice; the Sillerman Center for the Advancement of Philanthropy; the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion; and the School of Arts and Sciences Co-curricular Fund.