Past Events

Fall 2022

Cripping the Trans Archives: Eric’s Ego Trip

November 17, 2022

Speaker: Professor Slava Greenberg

2:20-3:40PM

Zoom

poster with neon text
Mandel Lecture in the Humanities: Divas, Drag Queens, Aunties, and Other Academic Personas

November 1, 2022

Speaker: Kareem Khubchandani, associate professor of theater, dance, and performance studies at Tufts University.

5:30-7PM

MCH G03

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Mandel Lecture in the Humanities: Lessons in Drag, with LaWhore Vagistan

October 28, 2022

Speaker: Kareem Khubchandani, associate professor of theater, dance, and performance studies at Tufts University.

5:00-6:30PM

Laurie Theater, Spingold Theater Center

Mandel Lectures in the Humanities Reception

October 27, 2022

5:30-6:30PM

Merrick Theater, Spingold Theater Center

Join us for food and drinks following the Dragademia performances.

poster featuring lawhore vagistan
Mandel Lecture in the Humanities: Dragademia - Dressing Up the University

October 27, 2022

Kareem Khubchandani is an associate professor of theater, dance, and performance studies at Tufts University whose research and creative work centers on queer, feminist, and trans aesthetics, namely in South Asia and its diasporas. Performing under the name LaWhore Vagistan, Kareem utilizes drag performance as a pedagogical tool. He is the author of Ishtyle: Accenting Gay Indian Nightlife (University of Michigan Press, 2020), which won the 2021 Association for Theatre in Higher Education Outstanding Book award, 2021 Dance Studies Association de la Torre Bueno book award, and the 2019 CLAGS: Center for LGBTQ Studies Fellowship. He is also co-editor of Queer Nightlife (University of Michigan Press, 2021) and curator of criticalauntystudies.com.

Featuring: Jacob Bird (Dinah Lux), Ryan Persadie (Tifa Wine), Enzo Toral (Penelope Sumac), and Uzma Zafar (Sher)

4:00-5:30PM

Laurie Theater, Spingold Theater Center

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Race and Revision: Editing Othello

October 25, 2022

Speaker: Patricia Akhimie (Rutgers University)

9:30-11:00AM, EST

Zoom

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Brandeis Novel Symposium: Reimagining Native America: D'Arcy McNickle's "The Surrounded" (1936)

October 14, 2022

11:00AM-5:00PM

Program

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Hurston's Secret Laughter: Contributions to African American Thought

September 30, 2022

Speaker: Lindsey Stewart (University of Memphis)

2:00-3:30PM, EST

Zoom

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What Could a Dissertation Be?

September 28, 2022

PhD dissertations in the humanities and social sciences have traditionally been scholarly proto-monographs. However, increasing numbers of PhD students are exploring alternative formats for communicating their research -- formats such as a series of articles, graphic novels, films, public facing blogs, apps and podcasts. Graduate departments are increasingly supporting these new forms, as are the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the Mellon Foundation. In this seminar, current Brandeis PhD students Nai Kim (English) and Yi He (English) will join Anna Williams (Assistant Lecturer and Co-Director of the Writing Center, Birmingham-Southern College) and Iván González-Soto (PhD Candidate, UC Merced) to discuss the benefits and challenges of non-traditional dissertations.

5:30-6:45PM, EST

Zoom

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Everyman and Everybody: The Problem of Black Matter

September 16, 2022

Speaker: Matthew Vernon (UC Davis)

2:00-3:30PM, EST

Zoom

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Fall Welcome and New Books Reception

September 8, 2022

4:30-5:30PM

Faculty presentations begin at 4:45PM.

MCH Atrium

Please join us for our fall welcome reception and celebration of new faculty publications.

Drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be served.

Steven Osuna Lecture

August 2, 2022

12:00-1:30PM

Professor Steven Osuna researches and teaches about race and racism, Latinx migration studies, capitalism, and criminology at CSU Long Beach. In this talk and Q&A session, he will discuss the links between racism, property, and policing in our current economic system. He will also discuss alternative visions for policing that involve humane measures and community control. Osuna's research critiques institutional racism and theorizes self-determination for communities of color, and his work is of special relevance now, particularly in the years of Black Lives Matter activism and a more outward-facing white supremacist presence in the U.S.

Zoom

Spring 2022

April 13, 2022

12:00-12:45PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public.

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3 Minute Thesis Competition

April 7, 2022

The Brandeis 3MT competition is a university-sponsored speaking competition designed to showcase graduate student research in three-minute talks to a general audience. This is an opportunity for graduate students engaged in original research to develop communication and presentation skills while sharing their work with faculty, staff, and students across Brandeis University.

7:00-9:00PM

Zoom

portrait if Akkai Padmashali
An Afternoon with Akkai Padmashali, gender justice activist

April 7, 2022

Akkai Padmashali is a transgender activist based in Bangalore, India, and the founder of Ondede, an organization working toward gender justice across social movements in India.  A longtime grassroots activist, Akkai was one of the co-petitioners who challenged Section 377, a colonial-era law that criminalized sodomy, in the Supreme Court of India in 2018. Her autobiography, Akkai, was written in collaboration with Prof. Gowri Vijayakumar and Prof. Dominic Davidappa, and published in Kannada in the summer of 2021.  The English version, A Small Step in a Long Journeywill be published this year. Akkai has won regional and national awards for her work as an activist and educator, and has traveled around the world to advocate and build coalitions around gender justice.

She will be in conversation with Professor Gowri Vijayakumar and Brandeis undergraduate students Inaara Gilani and Sanjitha Subramaniam.

10:00-11:30AM

Zoom

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March 31, 2022

Colm Tóibín is a renowned Irish novelist, poet, essayist, journalist, playwright, professor, and literary critic. Author of ten novels, including his 2021 publication The Magician, and Brooklyn, adapted to the BAFTA award-winning film of the same name in 2015, Tóibín's work explores religion, gender, sexuality, family, and Irish identity. His work has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize three times and received an LA Times Novel of the year award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, among many others. In addition to his fiction, he is a prolific literary critic and journalist, publishing in venues such as the New York Review of Books, the New Yorker, and The London Review of Books. Tóibín is currently the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University and Chancellor of the University of Liverpool. His first poetry collection, Vinegar Hill, is set to be published in April of 2022. Revisiting Brandeis after a decade, Professor Tóibín will be discussing the life and career of James Baldwin.

5:00-6:30PM

Schwartz 112

Open to the public.

March 31, 2022

12:00-1:00PM

MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room

Speaker: Colm Tóibín, Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities
Columbia University

This event will center on a discussion of Colm Tóibín's piece "Alone in Venice."

Open to the public.

March 30, 2022

5:30-6:30PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public. Drinks and sushi will be served.

poster featuring black and white photo

March 30, 2022

Colm Tóibín is a renowned Irish novelist, poet, essayist, journalist, playwright, professor, and literary critic. Author of ten novels, including his 2021 publication The Magician, and Brooklyn, adapted to the BAFTA award-winning film of the same name in 2015, Tóibín's work explores religion, gender, sexuality, family, and Irish identity. His work has been shortlisted for the Booker Prize three times and received an LA Times Novel of the year award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, among many others. In addition to his fiction, he is a prolific literary critic and journalist, publishing in venues such as the New York Review of Books, the New Yorker, and The London Review of Books. Tóibín is currently the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia University and Chancellor of the University of Liverpool. His first poetry collection, Vinegar Hill, is set to be published in April of 2022. Revisiting Brandeis after a decade, Professor Tóibín will be discussing the life and career of James Baldwin.

4:00-5:30PM

MCH G03

Open to the public.

white background with purple splotches and text reading interdisciplinary student colloquium
Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Colloquium

March 18, 2022

On Friday, March 18, the First Annual Interdisciplinary Graduate Student Colloquium was held in the Mandel Reading Room. This event, which was created and organized by a group of graduate students from different disciplines and funded by the Mandel Center for the Humanities, was envisioned as a way for graduate students to build community across departments, build skills in talking about their research outside of their disciplines and create conversations across fields. The IGSC was a roundtable event in which graduate students took turns presenting on their research and then heard prepared remarks from respondents from a different discipline on how they perceived their research and suggestions on possible directions they could take going forward.

 

The organizers of the event—Shirah Malka Cohen (NEJS), Miranda Peery (English), Monica Keel (WGS), Kerry Jo Greene (History), Sarah Beth Gable (History) and James Heazlewood-Dale (Musicology)—wanted this to be an opportunity for graduate students to practice speaking about their research in an approachable way as well as to look for the connections they have across disciplines. The structure was seven research presentations spread across two panels with a unique respondent for each from a total of six different disciplines, and then an open discussion period at the end, including questions from the audience. The event was very successful, with many participants commenting that it was one of the more fun and satisfying events they had attended, and the organizers are already looking forward to expanding and improving the event for next year.
poster of illuminated manuscript

March 17, 2022

12:00-1:00PM

MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room

Speaker: Dorothy Kim (English & Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)

Open to the public.

March 16, 2022

12:00-12:45PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public. Lunch will be served.

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Rajiv Mohabir Poetry Reading and Conversation with Faith Smith

March 14, 2022

Poet, professor, and translator Rajiv Mohabir is the author of two books of poetry, four chapbooks, and a memoir. Mohabir's genre-bending work explores queerness, Indo-Caribbean identity, and anti-colonialism, among other things. In his 2021 memoir, Antiman, Mohabir powerfully and poignantly melds poetry and prose as he grapples with, at times fraught, family relationships as well as personal and cultural identity. His work has received numerous awards including a Ghostbook Press inaugural chapbook prize for Acoustic Trauma, the 2014 Intro Prize in Poetry by Four Way books for The Taxidermist's Cut, a Voices of Our Nation's Artists Foundation Fellowship, and the New Immigrant Writing Award from Restless Books for Antiman. He is currently a professor for the BFA/MFA program in the Writing, Literature, and Publishing department at Emerson University and the Translations Editor at Waxwing Journal.

Following his poetry reading, Mohabir was in conversation with Brandeis University's Professor Faith Smith (AAAS and English).

two people talking 

3:00-4:30PM

MCH 303, Reading Room

March 9, 2022

12:00-12:45PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public.

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The Arboreal Humanities: Trees, Art, Activism

March 4, 2022

10:00 - 10:50 am EST - Zheng Bo (Hong Kong based video and installation artist) in conversation with Glyn Davis

11:00 - 11:50 am - Carl Phillips (Prof of English, Washington University, St. Louis) in conversation with Chris Barrett

12:00 - 12:50 pm - Eleanor Kaufman (Prof of Comparative Literature, UCLA) in conversation with Jonathan Flatley

2:00 - 3:00 pm - Manifesto Workshop coordinated by Caren Irr (Professor of English, Brandeis) and Laura Harris (Professor of Cinema Studies, NY)

Zoom

poster with monstera leaves

February 9, 2022

12:00-1:00PM

MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room

Speaker: Shoniqua Roach (African and African American Studies & Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)

Open to the public.

white and blue poster

January 27, 2022

12:00-1:00PM

Zoom

Speaker: Émilie Diouf (African and African American Studies, English, and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies)

Open to the public.

Fall 2021

December 1, 2021

12:00-12:45PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public.

poster with candyman poster and qr code
Candyman Film Screening

November 19, 2021

In this exciting event sponsored by Mandel Center for the Humanities, FTIM, and the English/ Creative Writing Departments, please join us for a screening of the brand new, highly anticipated 2021 film Candyman. The screening will be followed by a critical conversation led by Brandeis English professor, Dr. Brandon Callender. The discussion will center on the ongoing reimagination of how Blackness is represented within the horror genre.

Join the UDRs and faculty from the English, AAAS, and Film departments for the screening at 6pm, followed by a critical discussion at 7:30pm on November 19, 2021 in Wasserman Cinematheque.

November 9, 2021

Join author Nancy Langston and Brian Donahue, associate professor for Environmental Studies at Brandeis, for a book discussion about climate change and human impact on three  species in the U.S. Great Lakes region. 

In her book “Climate Ghosts,” environmental historian Langston researches the three so-called “ghost species” in the Great Lakes watershed—woodland caribou, common loons, and lake sturgeon. Ghost species are those that have not gone completely extinct, although they may be extirpated from a particular area. Their traces are still present, whether in DNA, in small fragmented populations, in lone individuals roaming a desolate landscape in search of mates. Learn how climate change and human impact affected these now ghost species, and what it will take to restore them.

This program is part of the Brandeis University Press Author Series 2021 (BUP).

 

7:00-8:00PM

Zoom

purple poster with four faces

November 3, 2021

This roundtable discussion, part of the MCH's new Humanists at Work series, is meant to initiate a discussion on our campus about the nature of public scholarship and to think more broadly about what research output might look like beyond the typical scholarly monograph. The invited speakers are all located in the academy but take an innovative approach to research, scholarship and publication.


Speakers:

David Sterling Brown—a Shakespeare and premodern critical race studies scholar—is Assistant Professor of English at Binghamton University and he is a current ACLS/Mellon Scholars and Society Fellow in residence with The Racial Imaginary Institute, founded by Claudia Rankine. Brown’s antiracist scholarship is published or forthcoming in Radical TeacherShakespeare BulletinShakespeare Studies, White People in Shakespeare, Hamlet: The State of PlayLos Angeles Review of Books and other venues. His forthcoming book projects examine race and whiteness in Shakespearean drama.

Maria Sachiko Cecire is an Associate Professor of Literature at Bard College, where she founded the academic program and Center for Experimental Humanities. She is the author of Re-Enchanted: The Rise of Children’s Fantasy Literature in the Twentieth Century (2019) and is now working on an interdisciplinary project about the intellectual lives of so-called “at-risk” youth and their responses to young adult literature. She is currently on leave from Bard to serve as a program officer in the Higher Learning program at the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

Kareem Khubchandani is the Mellon Bridge assistant professor in theater, dance, and performance studies, and women’s, gender, and sexuality studies at Tufts University. He is the author of Ishtyle: Accenting Gay Indian Nightlife (University of Michigan Press, 2020), which won the 2021 Association for Theatre in Higher Education Outstanding Book award, 2021 Dance Studies Association de la Torre Bueno book award, and the 2019 CLAGS: Center for LGBTQ Studies Fellowship. Kareem is also co-editor of Queer Nightlife (University of Michigan Press, 2021) and curator of criticalauntystudies.com

Marissa López is Professor of English and Chicana/o and Central American Studies at UCLA, researching Chicanx literature from the 19th century to the present.  She is the author of Chicano Nations (NYU 2011) and Racial Immanence (NYU 2019), and in 2020 served as a Scholar in Residence at the Los Angeles Public Library with whom she is collaborating to develop a mobile app, “Picturing Mexican America,” that uses geodata to display images of Mexican California to users.


November 3, 2021, 4:00-5:30PM EST
Zoom
Open to the public.

November 3, 2021

12:00-12:45PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public.

political cartoon black and white

November 3, 2021

Speaker: Paraska Tolan-Szkilnik (Assistant Professor of African and Middle East History, Suffolk University)

11:00AM-12:15PM

Zoom

purple poster featuring statue
Daoist Art and Imperial Icons in the Tang Dynasty

October 28, 2021

Speaker: Dr. Yang Liu (Chair of Asian Art and Curator of Chinese Art, Minneapolis Institute of Art)

10:00-11:30AM on Zoom

This lecture deals with the remarkable relationship between Daoist organization and the Tang court, and the significance of imperial patronage in the development of Tang Daoist art. Tang Daoist sculpture made for the temple is shown to possess a unique quality and iconography, revealing a mixture of religious devotion and political expediency, in which the Tang rulers promoted themselves to be the holy object equal to the god. It was under the strong influence of the imperial court, bound up with political expression and a realistic treatment, that the new methods of approaching the sacred images contributed widely to establish a new repertoire of Daoist imagery, and eventually allowed it to stand apart from its predecessors and its counterpart Buddhist iconography.
poster of spy silhouette

October 22, 2021

Graham Greene's The Quiet American

10:00AM-6:00PM

via Zoom

Open to the public.

poster of alpaca wool thread

October 20, 2021

12:00-1:00PM

MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room

Speaker: Patricia Alvarez Astacio (Anthropology)

Open to the public.

October 20, 2021

12:00-12:45PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public.

poster of stained glass window

September 30, 2021

1:00-2:00PM

MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room

Speaker: Clémentine Fauré-Bellaïche (French and Francophone Studies)

Open to the public.

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Fall Welcome Reception

September 23, 2021

5:00-6:00PM

MCH Atrium

Open to the public. Food and drinks will be served.

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"Rethinking the Humanities in Trying Times": A Lecture by Professor Leonard Cassuto

September 23, 2021

3:30-5:00PM

MCH 303, Reading Room

On Thursday, September 23, Dr. Leonard Cassuto, professor of English at Fordham University and the author of The New PhD: How to Build a Better Graduate Education who also writes the graduate advisor column for The Chronicle of Higher Education, gave the opening lecture for this year’s programming at the MCH. His talk, “Rethinking the Humanities in Trying Times,” argued that graduate education was already in trouble even before the recent pandemic. Making the case for a more student-centered approach to graduate education, Dr. Cassuto highlighted the fact that humanities graduate education focuses on training students for only one type of job—tenure-track professor at a research institution—even though only a very small minority of students will get that job. Dr. Cassuto put forth concrete suggestions for revitalizing the humanities PhD, such as encouraging public scholarship, focusing on professional skills that transfer to more than one type of job, and reducing the time it takes students to earn a degree in order to make graduate education more relevant and helpful to students who enter a diverse job market. His talk helped the audience reevaluate how they see humanities work in their own departments and to imagine new ways that humanistic thinking can be used in the world.

Professor Cassuto speaking at the Mandel Center for the Humanities

Spring 2021

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New Books Reception 2021

May 11, 2021

1:00–2:00 p.m.
Zoom
A celebration of the new year and faculty monographs published in 2019-2020 and 2020-2021.

Free and open to the public.

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April 22, 2021

1–2 p.m.
Zoom
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests.

Speaker: Sheida Soleimani (Fine Arts)

poster of protesters holding signs

April 15, 2021

1–2 p.m.
Zoom
Open to the public. 

This event will involve a discussion of two texts selected by Professor Brooks: Martin Luther King Jr.'s Letter from a Birmingham Jail and Love, Law, and Civil Disobedience.

Speaker: Daphne A. Brooks, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of African American Studies, Music, American Studies, and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies
Yale University

 

April 14, 2021

Noon–12:45 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public.
poster of protesters holding signs

April 8, 2021

4:30–6 p.m.
Zoom
Open to the public. 

Speaker: Daphne A. Brooks, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of African American Studies, Music, American Studies, and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies
Yale University

poster of protesters holding signs

April 7, 2021

4:30–6 p.m.
Zoom
Open to the public. 

Speaker: Daphne A. Brooks, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of African American Studies, Music, American Studies, and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies
Yale University

poster of protesters holding signs

April 5, 2021

4:30–6 p.m.
Zoom
Open to the public. 

Speaker: Daphne A. Brooks, William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of African American Studies, Music, American Studies, and Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Studies
Yale University

poster of a highway splitting into two directions

March 18, 2021

12–1 p.m.
Zoom
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests.

Speaker: Faith Smith (English & AAAS)

March 10, 2021

Noon–12:45 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public.
poster of a photo of children in black and white

February 25, 2021

1–2 p.m.
Zoom
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests.

Speaker: Yuri Doolan (History & WGS)

February 24, 2021

12-12:45 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public.
poster of outerspace
Bridging the Two Cultures: Visualizing the Invisible

February 10, 2021

Noon–1 p.m.
Zoom
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests.

Speakers: John Plotz (English) and John Wardle (Astrophysics)

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Close Looking: Exploring Roman Daily Life through Objects in the Classical Studies Artifact Research Collection (CLARC)

February 3, 2021

3:30–5 p.m.
Zoom
Open to the public.

Speakers: Ann Olga Koloski-Ostrow (Classical Studies) and Alexandra Ratzlaff (Classical Studies)

Fall 2020

poster featuring sketch of mouths

November 19, 2020

Noon–1 p.m.
Zoom
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests.

Speakers: Erin Gee (Music)

Close Looking: Adam Pendleton, "Larry Hinton (white)," 2012

November 12, 2020

Noon–1:30 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public.

Speakers: Isaiah Wooden (Theater Arts) and Elizabeth Bradfield (Creative Writing)

November 11, 2020

Noon–12:45 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public.
event poster in tan featuring a flower

November 6, 2020

11 a.m.–5 p.m.

Zoom
Open to the public.

Poster feature signs with fists
Close Looking: Annette Lemieux, "Left Right Left Right," 1995

October 22, 2020

3:30-5 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public

Speakers: Muna Guvenc (Fine Arts) and Sheida Soleimani (Fine Arts)

October 21, 2020

12-12:45 p.m.
Zoom
Free and open to the public.
event poster featuring a Japanese garden

October 7, 2020

1-2 p.m.
Zoom
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speaker: Aida Yuen Wong (Fine Arts & East Asian Studies)

Spring 2020

poster promoting event with angel of sleep ilustration
Bridging the Two Cultures: “Dreaming and Sleep”

March 5, 2020

Noon–1 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speakers: Leslie Griffith (Neuroscience) and Mary Baine Campbell (English)

March 4, 2020

Noon–12:45 p.m.
MCH Atrium
Free and open to the public

These concerts include a light lunch following the 45-60 minute performance.

poster for event featuring colorful toys in an Indian market

February 27, 2020

1–2 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speaker: Gowri Vijaykumar (Sociology)

February 12, 2020

MCH Atrium
Free and open to the public

These concerts include a light lunch following the 45-60 minute performance.

poster for event featuring photograph close up of old woman holding hands in her lap
Bridging the Two Cultures: “Cognitive Loss and Aging”

January 30, 2020

Noon–1 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speakers: Angela Gutchess (Psychology) and Arthur Wingfield (Neuroscience)

poster for event featuring black and white photograph of Holocaust Memorial in Berlin from below

January 23, 2020

Noon–1 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speaker: Alexander Kaye (Near Eastern and Judaic Studies)

Fall 2019

graphic of a hand on a mouse in front of a computer screen
Bridging the Two Cultures: “Navigation and Place”

November 21, 2019

Noon–1 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speakers: Stephen Van Hooser (Biology) and Shantanu Jadhav (Psychology)

Close Looking: Zilia Sánchez, "Las troyanas [The Trojans]," 1987-1997

November 20, 2019

3:30–5:00 p.m.
Rose Art Museum

Free and open to the public

Speakers: Faith Smith (English) and Raysa Mederos (Romance Studies)

November 13, 2019

Noon–12:45 p.m.
MCH Atrium
Free and open to the public

These concerts include a light lunch following the 45-60 minute performance.

illustration of brain split into two sides, left in black and white and right in color
Bridging the Two Cultures: “Technology and Creativity”

October 31, 2019

1–2 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

Speakers: Jim Haber (Biology) and Erin Gee (Music)

October 23, 2019

Noon–12:45 p.m.
MCH Atrium
Free and open to the public

These concerts include a light lunch following the 45-60 minute performance.

medieval painting with four figures, one holding a sword to a kneeing woman's hair

October 17, 2019

Noon–1 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room

Speaker: Dorothy Kim (English)

Close Looking: "Dante’s 1564 'Divine Comedy' and Censorship"

October 2, 2019

2–3:30 p.m.
Rapaporte Treasure Hall

Speakers: Laura Quinney (English) and Govind Sreenivasan (History)

 

"Minima Moralia" Today: A Symposium

September 20, 2019

9:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
MCH 303 Reading Room

September 18, 2019

Noon–12:45 p.m.
MCH Atrium
Free and open to the public

These concerts include a light lunch following the 45-60 minute performance.

image of event poster featuring a green arrow shooting through a colonial era hat and text with information about the event

September 11, 2019

1–2 p.m.
MCH 303, Mandel Reading Room
Only open to members of the faculty and invited guests

web banner in fall colors featuring autumnal leaf
Welcome Reception and New Books Celebration

September 5, 2019

4:30–6:30 p.m.
MCH Atrium

Spring 2019

Music at Mandel: Lydian String Quartet Sneak Peek

April 10, 2019

Faculty Lunch Lecture: Refugees or Radicals?: British Responses to the French Émigrés

April 4, 2019

Hannah Weiss Muller (History)

Music at Mandel: MusicUnitesUS Preview

March 27, 2019

Faculty Lunch Lecture: The Trials of Stella Goldschlag: Jews, Gender, and Enforced Collaboration During the Holocaust

March 21, 2019

Laura Jockusch (Near Eastern and Judaic Studies)

Mandel Lectures: Climate Grief: Toxics, Global Warming and Loons in the Boreal North

March 14, 2019

Nancy Langston (Michigan Technological University)

Mandel Lectures: Back from the Brink: Restoration History and Coaster Brook Trout

March 13, 2019

Nancy Langston, (Michigan Technological University)

Mandel Lectures: Mining, Toxics and Environmental Justice

March 13, 2019

Nancy Langston (Michigan Technological University)

Mandel Lectures: Ghost Species: the Uncertain Future of Woodland Caribou in the Anthropocene

March 11, 2019

Nancy Langston (Michigan Technological University)

Bridging the Two Cultures: Genes, Genomics, and Race

February 28, 2019

James E. Haber (Biology) and James R. Morris (Biology)

Close Looking Series: Archival Materials Related to the Establishment of AAAS

February 27, 2019

Chad Williams (African and African American Studies)

Music at Mandel: Undergraduate Student Showcase

February 13, 2019

Bridging the Two Cultures:Linguistics in the Age of Data: Introspection versus Observation

February 7, 2019

James Pustejovsky (Computer Science)

Close Looking Series: "What Remains to be Seen” Untitled #18 by Howardena Pindell

February 6, 2019

John F.C. Wardle (Astrophysics)