Events

View our past events page to watch recorded events. 

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Upcoming Events

October 19, 2022

12:30-1:30 p.m. ET/Online

A Publication of the HBI Series on Jewish Women.

Join HBI as we speak and learn with Tamar Biala, editor of “Dirshuni: Contemporary Women’s Midrash,” the first ever English edition of an historic collection of midrashim composed by Israeli women.

“How thrilling to have this rich collection of women’s midrashim in our hands. The melding of scholarship, deep insight, and creativity in this brilliantly edited volume yields fresh new feminist perspectives on classical Jewish tradition. We are truly blessed to have this resource for understanding biblical texts and rabbinic commentaries.” -- Marcia Falk, author of “Night of Beginnings: A Passover Haggadah”

This event is free and open to the public.

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October 26, 2022

7-8 p.m. ET/Online

HBI Scholar in Residence and University of Arizona professor Max Strassfeld argues that rabbinic literature’s eunuchs and androgynes profoundly shaped ideas about law, as the rabbis constructed intricate  classifications of gender across dozens of texts to understand an array of cultural tensions. In doing so, “Trans Talmud” deftly expands and challenges how we understand gender in Judaism.

"In a world that seeks to erase our history and our bodies, these texts provide images of a past where we may have existed, albeit with complexities. To study Talmud is to dream our past into the future, and to engage in the act of traveling through time accompanied by our ancestors’ voices. . . .As queer, trans and nonbinary Jews do the work of consciously creating a usable past, “Trans Talmud” invites us to do so with more integrity and precision."—Lilith Magazine, read the full review

Podcast / Listen to Shalom Hartman Institute's Yehuda Kurtzer in discussion with Max Strassfeld

“Trans Talmud” is available at the University of California Press, Bookshop, Amazon, and your local bookseller.

This event is free and open to the public.

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November 7, 2022

12-1 p.m. ET/Online

 Max Strassfeld, University of Arizona, HBI Scholar in Residence

“Queering and Transing the Jewish Life Cycle”

While in residence at the Hadassah-Brandeis Institute, Strassfeld will be working on a book project entitled “Embodied Law,” tracing the way time, the life cycle, and embodiment are constructed in rabbinic literature. Strassfeld will weave together trans theory, queer theory, and disability theory, with Jewish legal sources to examine different legal strategies to regulate messy embodiment.  

This event is free and open to the public.

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November 9, 2022

7-8 p.m. ET/Online

 A publication of the HBI Series on Jewish Women

Join HBI as we discuss this new, groundbreaking short story collection of feminist fiction with its editors, Susan Weidman Schneider and Yona Zeldis McDonough of “Lilith Magazine.” 

The range of stories, written by 44 different authors, some bestsellers; others emerging talents with ages ranging from their 20s to their 80s, comes right out of Jewish women’s lives today: transgressive loves, deepening connections, political turmoil, abortion, fear of loss, struggles with fertility, with body and soul, with finding community, with decoding family life. No one voice here represents the whole, but the stories interact with one another, like the tiles in a mosaic or the instruments in orchestral music.

“Frankly Feminist” is available at Brandeis University Press, Bookshop, Amazon, and your local bookseller.

HBI is a network member of the Jewish Book Council (JBC).

This event is free and open to the public.

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November 10, 2022

12-1 p.m. ET/Online

Michal Raucher, Rutgers University, HBI Scholar in Residence

“Rabbis Before Ordination: Origin Stories of Female Orthodox Rabbis”

In 2013, Yeshivat Maharat became the first Orthodox Jewish rabbinical seminary to ordain women. Yet, as women were finally becoming rabbis within Orthodoxy, the very definition of what it means to be a rabbi changed, making it increasingly hard for Orthodox women to establish themselves as recognized rabbinic authorities. Raucher’s work unpacks the complexity of being an Orthodox rabbi and argues that Orthodox women rabbis have both entered and contributed to a changing sphere of what counts as religious authority.

This event is free and open to the public.

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November 14, 2022

12-1 p.m. ET/Online

Sara Ronis, St. Mary’s University, Texas, HBI Scholar in Residence

“Gestating Difference: Jews, Non-Jews, and Abortion in the Babylonian Talmud”

Ronis explores fetal personhood in the rabbinic world of late antiquity. Using close readings of primary texts from Late Antiquity together with analyses informed by insights from anthropology, critical animal studies, post-human studies, ethics, and legal history, this project explores how the rabbis use the fetus to think about what it means to be a living being, a human, and a Jew and offers a new way to think about how personhood is socially mediated and culturally constructed.

This event is free and open to the public.

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November 21, 2022

12-1 p.m. ET/Online

Rachel Barenbaum, writer, HBI Scholar in Residence

 “Lady Killers: Jewish Female Assassins in late 19th Century Russia”

“Lady Killers” is a collection of six short stories, each portraying a separate Jewish female assassin from the Russian Revolution including women who ran safe houses, built and planted bombs and planned various assassination attempts against the Czar. The six stories will be tied together by themes of freedom and hope, showing all six women were dedicated to the idea of the greater good and a better future.

This event is free and open to the public.

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January 25, 2023

7-8  p.m. ET/Online

Join HBI as we speak, listen, and learn with Joy Ladin, widely published essayist and poet, literary scholar and author of "Shekhinah Speaks." In this new collection of compelling poetry, Ladin elucidates and channels the voice of the Shekhinah, Judaism’s feminine aspect of G-d, who speaks in the fundamental language of true universal love about our current conditions and challenges.

“In resplendent voice, Ladin reminds us we may yet be ‘comforted,’ if we can hear the Shekhinah speaking in us, if we who have ‘forgotten’ can remember that wherever we are, she is.” —Shara McCullum

HBI is honored to have supported Joy Ladin’s writing during this project. 

This event is free and open to the public.

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