FAQs

Financial FAQs

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Is financial aid available?

The program itself does not provide financial aid to students, but need-based financial aid may be available through the graduate school. For information contact: Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at (781) 736-3410 or visit their website.

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Are scholarships, teaching assistantships, or research assistantships available?

The Neuroscience MS program does not provide stipends, merit-based scholarships, teaching assistant positions, or paid research assistantships to Master’s student in Neuroscience. Rarely, master’s students may be hired to TA or work in a lab, but these positions are rare and are not guaranteed.

It is not recommended that applicants contact faculty members in advance of admission regarding lab work or employment.

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How much is tuition at Brandeis?

To determine the total cost of the program and to see the current tuition rates, please explore the graduate school’s cost of attendance calculator.

Full-time students will pay the full-time tuition for one year at Brandeis University. Full-time Master’s students who continue past one year will pay the “Extended Master’s Fee” in each additional semester. Full-time Master’s students who continue beyond one year to complete an optional thesis and are not enrolled in any other classes may qualify for an additional tuition waiver. Part-time students pay per course.

Application FAQs

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How do I apply?

Prospective students can apply online at the Brandeis University GSAS website.

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What is the application fee?

The application fee is $75. More information is available on the GSAS website (including information pertaining to application fee waiver requests).

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What are the GRE requirements?

GREs are not required. If they are submitted, they will be considered along with the rest of the application.

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What are the TOEFL requirements?

Almost all international applicants must submit official test score results from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), or the Pearson Test of English (PTE-Academic). An applicant should check with the testing agency to ensure that their scores are still valid and that the agency will be able to send an official score report.

Students who are citizens of the following countries, or who have graduated from an accredited degree program within these countries, are exempt from this requirement: Australia, Canada (except Quebec), Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, USA, and the United Kingdom. 

While the program will consider these scores within the context of the entire application, the graduate school does have strict exam score requirements. This information, as well as the extended policies for this requirement, is available on the GSAS website.

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Do I need to submit official test scores and transcripts?

Applicants should submit unofficial transcripts with their application. Official copies of your transcripts are required if you are admitted and decide to enroll in the program. More information about transcript submission is available on the GSAS website.

We will consider applications with unofficial self-reported test scores (GRE and TOEFL or equivalent), but applicants should make arrangements for official scores to be sent as soon as possible. The admissions committee may require official test scores before an admission decision is made. We strongly encourage applicants to include self-reported test scores when submitting their applications, as the admissions committee will not consider applications without them and it may take several weeks for official test scores to be sent, received, and processed. While GRE scores are not required, if you choose to submit them, they will be considered along with the rest of the application. When submitting unofficial GRE scores, please make sure to include the GRE percentile scores. Due to variability between GRE tests and the recent change in the GRE scoring practice, the admissions committee relies primarily on GRE percentile scores rather than raw scores.

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When can I apply?

The Neuroscience Master’s program accepts applications for the Fall semester only. Applications will be considered and admission offers will be made on a rolling basis until May 1; application review begins on January 15. Please note that the application may be closed earlier if the desired cohort size is reached prior to May 1. As we cannot predict when we will complete the admission cycle each year, applicants are advised to submit applications as early as possible.

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I am an international student; how do I obtain a visa?

The Graduate School will coordinate all aspects of your visa with the International Students and Scholars Office (ISSO), once accepted into the program. More information about requirements for international students is available on the GSAS website. More information for international students can be found on ISSO’s website.

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I applied to the PhD program but was denied, can I be considered for the MS program?

If you would like to be considered for the Master's program if denied admission from the PhD program, please contact the Division of Science Graduate Affairs Office at by email or by calling 781-736-2352.

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Will attending Brandeis as a MS student guarantee me a spot as a PhD student?

A spot in the PhD program is not guaranteed for Master’s students. Brandeis MS students who wish to transfer to the PhD program must formally apply to the PhD program. The PhD admissions committees will consider such applications within the context of the entire applicant pool. However, should a MS student be accepted into the PhD program, they will be allowed to transfer any eligible (i.e. those that meet the program requirements and specifications) courses towards their PhD course requirements. The time spent as an MS student will count towards the three-year-minimum residency for the PhD program.

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Do I need to contact anyone in the program before applying to the MS program?

Applicants do not need to contact anyone in the program prior to applying. Applicants do not need to identify a faculty supervisor to submit an application. In fact it is not recommended that applicants contact faculty members in advance of admission regarding lab work or employment. Faculty members cannot accept graduate students into their labs prior to acceptance into the program and rarely accept students before the start of classes.

If you have any questions about the program or about the application process, please contact the Division of Science Graduate Affairs Office at by email or by calling 781-736-2352.

Program Requirement FAQs

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How long does it take to get a Master's degree?

The minimum residency requirement is one year and the program is designed to be completed in one year as a full-time student. Some students, particularly those who wish to have an extended research experience or complete an optional MS thesis, complete the program in longer than one year. This is determined on a case-by-case basis.

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Can I attend the Master’s program as a part-time student?

Yes, the Neuroscience MS program can be completed part-time. Part-time students must enroll in fewer than 12 credits per semester. Applicants may apply as a part-time student or may change their status to part-time at a later date, with approval by the program chair. Applicants considering part-time study should be aware that the courses required for the program are typically offered only on weekdays with few to no evening or weekend options.

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What are the course requirements for a Master's degree in Neuroscience?

Students are required to take six graduate level courses, usually three per semester, and pass with a B- or higher. These courses must be “graduate-level” (i.e. 100 or higher) and be listed or cross-listed in the Neuroscience program section of the Brandeis Bulletin. Exceptions to this must be approved by the graduate committee. The six courses must include NBio 140 and Masters Proseminar Biol2 05. In addition, all students must enroll in and attend the Graduate Student Research Seminars (Biol 350), a Journal Club (typically NBio 306), and Responsible Conduct of Research (Cont 300b) or equivalent.

Please see the Neuro MS graduate handbook or the University Bulletin for detailed information.

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What are the research requirements?

All Neuro MS students must complete at least one semester of a research component. This can be satisfied through either an approved Project Lab course, or through the Master’s Research Lab (Neur 296) in the lab of at least one faculty member.

Please see the Neuro MS graduate handbook or the University Bulletin for detailed information.

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How do I choose a research lab?

Master’s students are not guaranteed a spot in a research lab. Those that wish to complete their research requirement through independent lab work are responsible for arranging a rotation with a faculty member themselves. To aid in this process, the Life Sciences programs hold a “faculty bazaar” during orientation. This is a three-night series of short research presentations (with dinner) designed to acquaint students with research opportunities at Brandeis. We cannot, however, guarantee that every faculty member that speaks during the faculty bazaar has space for a Master’s rotation student. Students who are interested in a particular lab should discuss rotations with faculty following the faculty bazaar.

It is not recommended that applicants contact faculty members in advance of admission or before the start of class regarding lab work. Faculty members cannot accept graduate students into their labs prior to acceptance into the program and rarely accept students before the start of classes.

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What is the process for completing a MS thesis?

Master's students who have carried out independent research have the option of completing a Master's thesis, typically after taking either project lab or (as is more common) at least one semester of master's research lab (Neur 296). It is the responsibility of the students to find a research advisor for the thesis work and submission of a Master's thesis requires mutual agreement between the student, advisor, and program chair. Students that wish to complete a Master's thesis should indicate this interest to their faculty advisor at the beginning of their Master's research lab work. The mutual agreement that a thesis will be written is declared after one (rare) or two (most common) semesters of Neur 296 research, and after substantial progress has been made on the research project. Students who complete a Master's thesis generally extend their time in the program to 1.5 or 2 years residency. A student who plans to register for Neur 299 (Master’s Thesis Research) in the following semester must notify the program chair and the Div Sci Graduate Affairs Office of their intention no later than Nov. 1 for a Spring semester thesis and March 1st for a Fall semester thesis.